The Summer's Hot GOP Villains

By Cottle, Michelle | Newsweek, July 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Summer's Hot GOP Villains


Cottle, Michelle, Newsweek


Byline: Michelle Cottle

At last, conservatives are leaving their (bite) mark on Hollywood.

Conservatives love to grouse that Hollywood hates them. For its part, Hollywood tends to yawn, roll its eyes, or nod distractedly. Unlike red-state America, which cannot avoid what it regards as the liberal values that permeate pop culture, the entertainment industry can, for the most part, ignore conservative culture.

This year's Republican presidential primaries, however, threw conservative values front and center as multiple candidates raced to the right. Early on there was much talk of God, prayer, and divine callings. Later the spotlight fell on issues like abortion, contraception, and the faith-destroying influence of college.

Confronted with such a foreign spectacle, Hollywood creative types did what they do: used the material to flesh out their work.

Chatting about her role in the new movie Rock of Ages, Catherine Zeta-Jones recently told the trade media that she drew inspiration from one of the Republican contenders in this year's presidential race. "I kind of had a Michele Bachmann moment," explained the Academy-and Tony-Award-winning actress. Of course, Zeta-Jones's revelation might have been more flattering if the character in question, Patricia Whitmore, weren't the film's chief villain, a tightly wound Bible thumper crusading against "sex, hateful music, and sex."

At least Bachmann wasn't the model for a 500-year-old blood-sucking creature of the night. That distinction goes to another recent White House hopeful, Rick Santorum. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Summer's Hot GOP Villains
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.