Report from the Field: Outcome Evaluation of the Library Media Program on Information Literacy Skills in Montgomery County Public Schools, Maryland

By Bailey, Gail C.; Paul, Myra A. | Teacher Librarian, June 2012 | Go to article overview

Report from the Field: Outcome Evaluation of the Library Media Program on Information Literacy Skills in Montgomery County Public Schools, Maryland


Bailey, Gail C., Paul, Myra A., Teacher Librarian


INTRODUCTION

The results are in! Those in the school library media field have known for years that students who have access to an effective library media program as evidenced by several correlates (e.g., certified staff, materials budget, technology, flexible schedules, and collaborative planning with classroom teachers) will score higher on state reading assessments (Scholastic, 2008). Montgomery County Public Schools (MCPS) in Maryland took these studies a step further. School Library Media Programs (SLMP) in collaboration with the Office of Shared Accountability (1) designed a research study based on the results of an online assessment of students' information literacy skills in grades 5, 8, and 11. The study demonstrated empirically that information literacy skills instruction strongly influences student reading achievement. To measure students' acquisition of information literacy skills, library media specialists administered the Tools for Real-Time Assessment of Information Literacy Skills (TRAILS) (2) developed by Kent State University to one to five class sections in grades 5, 8, and 11 across the district. In grade 5, 4,221 students participated; 2,226 students in grade 8; and 1,629 in grade 11. The results were then analyzed against student scores on state reading assessments to determine the influence of information literacy on reading achievement.

Located in the Washington, D.C., suburbs, MCPS is the sixteenth largest school district in the United States with a high school graduation rate of ninety percent. There are 200 schools; 22,500 staff members; and one certified library media specialist in every school with library media assistants (.5 or more dependent on school enrollment). School Library Media Programs (SLMP) is a unit in the Office of Curriculum and Instructional Programs that has responsibility for the leadership and direction of library media programs systemwide.

MCPS is a data-driven school system that invests considerable time, money, and resources into its school reform initiatives (e.g., professional growth system, full-day kindergarten, and curriculum revisions, including programming). The purpose of this article is to explain how a district-wide information literacy skills assessment demonstrates the contributions that school library media programs make to the success of a curriculum revision initiative using school achievement data. The explanation begins with a brief description of the study, includes the implementation process, barriers encountered, strategies employed for overcoming the barriers, refinements made to the process, and concludes with recommendations for the continuation of the assessment culture.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE STUDY

The study sought to answer the following two research questions at different grade levels: (1) How does the instruction provided by school library media programs in MCPS effect students' acquisition of information literacy skills? (2) How does students' acquisition of information literacy skills correlate with their academic achievement as measured by the Maryland School Assessment (MSA) in reading and the High School Assessment (HSA) in English?

Using TRAILS, library media specialists assessed students' acquisition of information literacy skills based on instruction developed with MCPS information literacy standards that include locating, collecting, organizing, interpreting, and sharing information in an ethical manner integrated into the content areas. The MSA in reading was used to measure elementary and middle school student achievement in grades 5 and 8, respectively, and the HSA in English measured student achievement in grade 10. Student characteristics (i.e., Title I enrollment, gender, race, ethnicity, participation in the free and reduced meals program, receipt of special education services, and English language proficiency) were used to disaggregate the data and conduct a multiple regression analysis. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Report from the Field: Outcome Evaluation of the Library Media Program on Information Literacy Skills in Montgomery County Public Schools, Maryland
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.