Triple-Certified Professional Is No Stranger to Success

By Strong, Ken | Corrections Today, April-May 2012 | Go to article overview

Triple-Certified Professional Is No Stranger to Success


Strong, Ken, Corrections Today


The impact of lead paint poisoning can be life-shattering for a child. During the past three years, lead paint poisoning has been prevented for hundreds of children in Baltimore due to the diligent work of Romeo Joyner-El. As a social services coordination supervisor in the Lead Hazard Reduction Program at Baltimore Housing, he uses his corrections background and skills to support and assist families whose children are at risk of lead paint poisoning. In January of this year, Joyner-El was qualified for the certified corrections supervisor/security threat groups credential from the American Correctional Association. Out of the thousands of corrections professionals in the nation, he is recognized as the second person to become triple certified through ACA. "Although it was challenging, the honor of being nationally recognized as a triple-certified corrections professional makes me feel good," said Joyner-El.

Joyner-El developed his strong supervisory, organizational and human relations skills through a successful 16-year career in the field of corrections and training from ACA. He began receiving and maintaining ACA certifications during his tenure at the Maryland Department of Pretrial Detention Services (MDPDS). His first ACA accreditation was the certified corrections supervisor credential. No stranger to great accomplishments, Joyner-El became the first person to earn the certified corrections supervisor/juvenile credential.

In 2005, Joyner-El retired from the MDPDS at the rank of lieutenant. …

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