FORTY REASONS Your Diet ISN'T Working; Doing Yoga. the Wrong Mix of Brain Chemic Cals. Even Listening to Pop. Using G the Latest Scientific Research, We E Reveal The

Daily Mail (London), July 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

FORTY REASONS Your Diet ISN'T Working; Doing Yoga. the Wrong Mix of Brain Chemic Cals. Even Listening to Pop. Using G the Latest Scientific Research, We E Reveal The


Byline: PETA BEE

WHY is it that your diet and exercise regimens never seem to work? Possibly you're unwittingly undoing your best efforts. Last week, the British Nutrition Foundation identified more than 100 different factors that influence our weight.

However, many of the tips they offered -- such as eating smaller portions and not relying on ready-made foods that are high in calories and fat -- are fairly obvious.

Here, we list the other, more surprising habits that are sabotaging your weightloss regimen ...

Look again at your shopping trolley

1 EATING cereal for breakfast. A U.S. study found breakfast cereal sweetened with sugar left overweight participants hungry before lunchtime, and they consumed more calories a day than those given an egg for breakfast (the protein kept them full). Egg eaters also had significantly lower levels of ghrelin, a hormone that stimulates appetite.

2 HAVING milk in your tea. Last year, Indian scientists found tea contains high levels of compounds, theaflavins and thearubigins, that help to reduce the amount of fat absorbed by the gut, and can cut cholesterol. However, proteins found in cows' milk neutralise this ability. Drink your tea black.

3 EATING white bread. Too many refined carbs, especially white bread and white rice, can lead to weight gain, particularly around the midriff, found researchers at Tufts University in Boston.

Two groups ate roughly the same number of calories each day, but those who ate mostly refined carbs added a half inch on their waist per year compared with those eating unrefined 'whole' foods such as vegetables and wholegrain bread.

4 NOT reading food labels. A study in the Journal of Consumer Affairs showed that people who habitually read food labels as well as taking exercise lose more weight than those who merely exercise. What's more, those who only read food labels and are sedentary lose more than those who exercise but ignore the food labels.

5 DRINKING too much fruit juice. Fruit juices and other sugary drinks have a stronger impact on weight than calories from solid food, according to a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Cutting out just one sugary drink a day resulted in a weight loss of more than 1lb after six months.

6 UNDERSEASONING your food. Adding a bit of ground cayenne pepper to your meal can help burn calories faster. What's more, the pepper seems to curb hunger -- especially for fatty, salty and sweet foods, found nutritionists at Purdue University in Indiana.

7 AVOIDING yoghurt. A study in the International Journal of Obesity found obese adults who ate three servings of fat-free yoghurt a day as part of a reduced-calorie diet lost 22per cent more weight and 61per cent more body fat than those who simply cut calories.

Yoghurt eaters also lost 81 per cent more fat in the stomach area. It's thought the calcium and protein in dairy products may help burn fat.

How friends ruin your plans

8 OVERWEIGHT friends. If your friends gain weight, the chances are you will, too, according to a study from Harvard University. 'We find that having four obese friends doubled people's chance of becoming obese, compared with people with no obese friends,' says Alison Hill, the study's lead author.

Why? A recent Dutch study found that we tend to mimic each other's behaviour when we eat out, taking a bite at the same time.

9 READING recipe books and magazines. Professor Kathleen Page, a psychologist at the University of Southern California, discovered looking at pictures of high-fat foods stimulates the brain's appetite control centre, leading to an elevated desire for sweet and savoury food.

10NOT chewing enough. The longer food remains in the mouth, the more chance the tongue has to send messages to the brain to release the necessary digestive juices. 'Chewing and digesting solid food fills you up,' says dietitian Helen Bond. …

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