The Mail


'The Digital 100 Power Index'

Where are the women among the 100 most powerful digital disruptors (July 2 & 9)? Did the 10 panels of experts not look in the right places to find more women, or were they nowhere to be found? When women comprise 60 percent of college undergraduates but the digital world is still dominated by men, it's time to adjust the gender imbalance and train and recruit more women. They could be the next generation of evangelists, builders, wizards, and revolutionaries.

Madeleine M. Kunin, Burlington, Vt.

'Entitled to a Fair Shot'

I've always loved the game of basketball, but was not quite tall enough, strong enough, or talented enough to play on a Division I men's team. While an undergraduate at UCLA, however, I was able to play on a men's practice team that helped develop the scholar athletes on the UCLA women's team, which was led by head coach Nikki Caldwell. When coach Caldwell moved to Louisiana State University in 2011, she gave me an opportunity to join her. The women I interact with each day are every bit as talented, smart, and hardworking as their male counterparts and certainly deserve an equal opportunity.

Jonathan A. Silver, Director of Women's Basketball Operations, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, La.

'War of the Wombs'

Although I disagree with his views, I admire Keith Mason's convictions. If he really walked his talk, however, he and his wife would be adopting their fourth child rather than creating more life themselves. There are many unwanted children born every day, and there will be thousands more if Roe v. Wade is overturned.

John Mies, Urbana, Ill.

Keith and Jennifer Mason's efforts to pass "personhood" amendments reflect the evangelical, absolutist perspectives of the Republican far right. …

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