Many Veterans See a Surge in Patriotism

The Florida Times Union, June 30, 2012 | Go to article overview

Many Veterans See a Surge in Patriotism


As we near July Fourth, it seems appropriate to check the patriotism level of the nation.

There is no better test than to ask members of our Email Group with some military background.

We started with a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being the patriotism level during World War II. Many of our respondents found a surge of patriotism after Sept. 11, 2001. Others are not so sure.

To read more commentary on this subject, go to our Opinion Page Blog: jacksonville.com/opinion.

A MIXED GRADE

If by patriotism you mean love of one's country and support of the values of our Founding Fathers, I would say that it stands today at an 8 out of 10.

If you mean by patriotism, faith in and support of our government as it pursues the common good, I would say that it stands as a 2 out of 10.

A nanny government that redistributes wealth based on class hatred destroys patriotism and fosters revolution.

Love of one's country is fostered by an educational system that teaches the history of our country along with a firm understanding of civics devoid of political correctness. Literacy is essential to the growth and survival of patriotism.

The nation becomes more patriotic as the interference of government in one's daily life is minimized.

Term limits for elected and appointed offices (including judges) is essential to the revitalization of faith in and support of our government. The Congress as it is currently constituted and operated is a detriment to patriotism of any kind.

Love of country is alive and well in spite of all branches of our current federal government.

Richard A. Stratton, Atlantic Beach

MUCH BETTER THAN VIETNAM ERA

Between active duty and the Air Guard, I spent more than 28 years in the military.

Is the level of patriotism higher today than it was during the Vietnam War? Most definitely!

On a scale of 1 to 10, the level of patriotism is at a 10 plus. I have been lucky enough to attend the homecoming of many troops that returned from Iraq and Afghanistan.

As they come off the plane and walk into the terminal building, they are so surprised by the homecoming that they are receiving.

From the Patriot Guard lining the hall with American flags, other members of the military, family, friends and complete strangers who just happened to be there, the applause, handshakes, hugs and kisses are overwhelming.

It wasn't that way when I and my fellow servicemen returned from Vietnam. I am so proud to see the way that we now welcome home our fighting men and women. It always brings tears to my eyes.

May we never go back to the way some of us were treated. Even if you don't believe in the war, honor those men and women who served in order to protect us.

God bless our troops!

Gennard Lepore Jr., Jacksonville

CONSIDER PATRIOTIC MUSIC

As a Navy veteran who served in uniform for 25 years, patriotism has always been an important part of my life. …

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