Negotiating High School

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), June 18, 2012 | Go to article overview

Negotiating High School


Byline: The Register-Guard

Anyone who believes teenagers have it easy these days should think again. In addition to dealing with school, changes in physical and mental development, pressures from adults to conform and their fluctuating hormones, teenagers have a multitude of things to learn - and to worry about.

That's clear from reading the latest Youth Risk Behavior Survey from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The 2011 survey asked 86 questions of more than 15,000 high school students nationwide dealing with violence, tobacco use, drug use, sexual behavior, diet and physical inactivity. Participation was anonymous and voluntary and required the permission of parents or guardians.

Forty-three states took part in the survey, not including Oregon, which does its own youth behavior surveys. Its last, in 2010, collected more than 15,000 responses from sixth-, eighth- and 11-graders at more than 450 schools. While many of the Oregon Student Wellness Survey percentages were lower than those in the national report, the trends were similar.

News reports on the CDC survey focused on high-visibility issues such as a decline in the percentage of teenagers who said they drank alcohol while driving in the month prior to taking the survey - from 17 percent in 1997 to 8 percent last year - and the percentage who said they had texted or e-mailed at least once while driving within the previous 30 days, a worrisome 33 percent, and 60 percent for 12th-grade boys.

Probably the most surprising result was that more teenagers admitted to smoking marijuana, 23 percent, than to smoking cigarettes (18 percent), a trend that's cause for both concern and relief. Other favorable trends included declines in the percentage who said they had carried a weapon to school (now less than a third) and currently use alcohol (down from about half to 39 percent).

Not-so-favorable statistics included more than a third of all teenagers reporting they were sexually active, from about one in five in the ninth grade to close to half in the 12th grade. Of those, more than 60 percent said they used condoms, which was good news given that people age 15 through 19 now account for more than 400,000 U.S. births each year and more than a half-million cases of sexually-transmitted diseases.

Some statistics have been resistant to change since the surveys began in 1991. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Negotiating High School
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.