Rock Baroque; Classical Music with Hint of Flamboyance

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), July 13, 2012 | Go to article overview

Rock Baroque; Classical Music with Hint of Flamboyance


Byline: SARAH BATLEY

CLASSICAL music is not meant to be about flamboyance and theatre nor is it usually visually exciting - but don't tell that to Red Priest. Expect the unexpected from the Baroque quartet when the four irreverent but talented musicians perform at the North Wales International Music Festival.

Comprising recorder player Piers Adams, his wife, baroque violin specialist, Julia Bishop, cellist Angela East and harpsichordist David Wright, Red Priest pack their performances with energy, theatre and visually stunning effects.

According to Piers Adams, the fact their high-energy theatrical style is contrary to everything classical purists believe in is something really worth celebrating.

He said: "Musically we are four misfits to be quite frank. But what we try and do is inject a whole lot of fun into our performances and make them exciting.

"After all Baroque music started out in around 1600 and went on until 1750 or so. It was new, exciting and would have been performed flamboyantly.

"We try and reflect that while others may try and be academically accurate in how they perform, we play from memory and don't use sheet music. For us it's more about energy and taking the music to a whole new level."

Piers believes the mix of instruments they use in their music makes for a perfect sound.

He added: "There were certainly pieces written for just the instruments we play. Actually it's not too dissimilar to a rock band. The recorder is like the lead singer, the violin like the lead or rhythm guitar, the cellist is the bass guitar player and the harpsichord provides the percussion.

"I think a lot of the purists thought we'd be a flash in the pan and would quickly, if not quietly, disappear. …

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