'Forgotten' War Played Major Role in Oregon History

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), July 1, 2012 | Go to article overview

'Forgotten' War Played Major Role in Oregon History


Byline: Douglas Card

As we prepare to celebrate the 4th of July and our successful Revolutionary War, there's another early war we should reflect upon, for it's sometimes called "America's Second War of Independence."

It has also been called America's "most bumbling, most confusing, and most forgotten conflict." We began our national "celebration" of its bicentennial in June, though it's unlikely many noticed.

Most of us remember hardly a thing about the War of 1812 - perhaps the British burning Washington, Andrew Jackson at the Battle of New Orleans, and certainly the "Star Spangled Banner." The war's ending was so inconclusive that under the Treaty of Ghent, it was "status ante bellum," as all territory seized by either America or England and Canada had to revert to prewar boundaries.

But who recalls that this obscure little war back East had a major impact on Oregon? This strange story goes back to the expansionist conflict between Great Britain and the United States over control of the wealth of the fur trade of the Northwest.

While America had a strong claim to the Oregon Territory thanks to Lewis and Clark's travels and Capt. Robert Gray's exploration of the Columbia River, the powerful British-Canadian North West Company was sweeping west through Canada, searching for ground free from its bitter rival, the British Hudson's Bay Company, with whom it was engaged in deadly conflict back East.

When the North West Company arrived at the mouth of the Columbia in 1811, however, it found an American fort already there - Astoria. This had recently been established by the Pacific Fur Company, a subsidiary of John Jacob Astor's American Fur Company. Though mainly owned by the fabulously wealthy Astor, his junior partners who actually ran the Pacific Fur Company included both Canadians such as Donald Mac kenzie and Americans such as Wilson Price Hunt.

The colorful story of Fort Astoria was romantically narrated in the American literary classic "Astoria" by Washington Irving, author of the famous "Legend of Sleepy Hollow."

The Americans had quickly achieved success with Astor's well-financed plan to ship their Oregon furs to China, trading for Chinese goods to bring to America. Besides Fort Astoria, the Pacific Fur Company established a string of posts throughout the Northwest, as far as today's Montana and British Columbia.

However, various problems occurred, and the company was short of food and supplies. In 1812, Donald Mackenzie led a Pacific Fur Company exploring party up the Willamette Valley, an event whose bicentennial was recently celebrated locally. From a historical perspective, the most significant aspect of his trip was to open the Willamette Valley to the Americans - for though Scottish-led, it was an American enterprise.

But then came the news of the war back East between England and America. Suddenly Fort Astoria was vulnerable to roving British ships and pressure from the North West Company. The partners staffing the fort feared that at any time an English ship might enter the bay and seize the fort as a prize of war.

Thus, Duncan McDougal, supported by Mackenzie, made the controversial decision to sell the fort and its string of outposts to the North West Company for whatever money could be obtained before a British ship could claim it for free. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Forgotten' War Played Major Role in Oregon History
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.