Interactive Exhibitions Bring Fun with Certain Grain of Truth; Art

Coventry Evening Telegraph (England), July 20, 2012 | Go to article overview

Interactive Exhibitions Bring Fun with Certain Grain of Truth; Art


Byline: JULIE CHAMBERLAIN

THERE'S more than just top drama to see in Shakespeare's home town this summer.

Two fascinating and different exhibitions let grains of rice and wall projections take centre stage at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford.

Digital projections by artists Squidsoup take over on the Colonnade and Relic Wall downstairs.

Bard quotes blast up on the wall in one only for more blotches to appear as people walk past the display, changing it and making fun patterns.

In another work, shapes appear on a shiny surface, and you can create ghostly images by moving about in front of it. When a ball appears, bat it away in mid air, and a projection scuttles up the wall, with words weaving around in different directions.

It's fun and brings out the big kid in all of us.

Meanwhile, theatre company Stan's Caf is staging Of All The People In The World in the PACCAR Room.

It features 1,033 kilogrammes of rice, apparently 62 million grains, one for everyone in the UK. In this performance piece, members of the company are there for part of each day in caretaker uniforms, measuring out the rice into labeled piles representing a huge range of world population statistics. It's a simple and effective and shows that statistics don't have to be boring. The pile representing civilians killed in Iraq since 2003 is far bigger than that of military advisers killed there in the same period.

The rice piles also reveal far more women in England and Wales aged over 40 got pregnant in a year than teenagers. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Upgrade your membership to receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad‑free environment

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Interactive Exhibitions Bring Fun with Certain Grain of Truth; Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.