Joe Posnanski

By Dokoupil, Tony | Newsweek, August 6, 2012 | Go to article overview

Joe Posnanski


Dokoupil, Tony, Newsweek


Byline: Tony Dokoupil

Will a feel-good sportswriter be too nice to Father Joe?

"everything has been just sort of this big, wonderful surprise." That's how nice-guy sportswriter Joe Posnanski recently described his career. But he may want to scratch the word "wonderful." Eighteen months ago he embarked on a sunny biography of one of America's most loved characters, Penn State football coach Joe Paterno. In a proposal sent to publishers, Posnanski outlined how he won over Paterno and his family, promising the story of "a remarkable life and the many people who have been touched by it."

He was eight months into all-access reporting when Paterno was fired, and the word "touched" took on its heinous new meaning. But over the next seven months he stayed with his subject, trying to reconcile the "Father Joe" he befriended with the vile portrait being drawn by others. He wrote the book this spring, before the NCAA's decision to vacate more than 100 of Paterno's wins and an investigation damned the coach's "total and consistent disregard" for the welfare of children.

Depending on whom you ask, the heavily guarded manuscript will be either the last nail in Father Joe's coffin or the first brick in his new cathedral. The publisher is promising "the fullest description we will ever have of the man's character and career." "It was never a gauzy Father's Day book," says Simon & Schuster publisher Jonathan Karp, which is hard to believe in light of the initial pub date, Father's Day 2013.

Posnanski, a writer for a new USA Today/Major League Baseball venture, is beloved--and not for his sharp-elbowed profiles. He criticized the "moralistic and judgmental" tone his peers took with Tiger Woods, and has a gift for blowing dandelion seeds on his own subjects, no matter how sad. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Joe Posnanski
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.