Yes, a Brilliant Show and Danny Boyle's a Genius. but Why Have So Many Been Taken in by His Marxist Propaganda?

Daily Mail (London), August 2, 2012 | Go to article overview

Yes, a Brilliant Show and Danny Boyle's a Genius. but Why Have So Many Been Taken in by His Marxist Propaganda?


Byline: Stephen Glover

CAN there be a more ingenious and creative film director in the world than Danny Boyle? I very much doubt it. The man who devised last Friday's opening ceremony to the London Olympics deserves an instant knighthood at the very least -- not that I'd expect him, as a man of the Left, to accept it.

The brilliant Mr Boyle offered a billion or so people a strictly Marxist interpretation of British history. But far from being criticised for taking liberties with [pounds sterling]27million of public money, he has been lauded on the Right -- not least by David Cameron -- as much as by the Left. Clever man.

Whether more than a very few of the billion people who watched it realised they were being treated to a Marxist take on history, I doubt. More plaudits for Mr Boyle. He offered us a Marxist analysis without most of us realising it!

First we had the Arcadian bliss of pre-Industrial Revolution England with its happy peasants milling about with their sheep and geese. Their idyll was destroyed by the 'satanic mills' represented by the marvellously theatrical chimneys rising up from the ground.

This is the view of industrialisation provided by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels in the Communist Manifesto, published in 1848, in which they lamented the effects of industrialisation and Free Trade, and wrote of the destruction of 'feudal, patriarchal, idyllic relations' that had supposedly existed in the countryside.

It seems barely to have occurred to Marx and Engels, any more than it does to Mr Boyle, that the lives of the pre-Industrial Revolution rural poor were disfigured by ignorance, disease and illiteracy, and that life in the cities, though undoubtedly very hard for many, led quite soon to a higher standard of living and at least a modicum of education.

According to Mr Boyle's re-fashioning of history on Friday night, the urban poor were merely repressed by stovepipe-hatted capitalists. For him, subsequent history has consisted of a series of challenges to capitalist power (the Marxist class struggle) represented by the suffragettes, the Jarrow hunger marchers in the Thirties, and immigrants landing in Britain on the Empire Windrush.

Freed from their capitalist repressors, the people were able to create the NHS (much joyous jumping about on beds and myriad sweet-natured Mary Poppinses) and popular music, represented by The Beatles, the Sex Pistols and the Clash. The people's bliss has been re - established.

ALL this was superbly choreographed and dramatically presented by Danny Boyle. But now that the dust has settled, I hope I may be allowed to suggest that his Marxist version of our island history was ludicrously lopsided. Marxists will not mind. As I'm not a Marxist, I do.

There were no references to the achievements of the Empire which, for all its many defects, succeeded in spreading British culture and technology, as well as the English language, to more than a quarter of the globe. Empires for the likes of Danny Boyle are purely repressive.

Nor were there even fleeting references to the role of the Church or religion in British society (Marxists don't like God) or to the inventions and innovations (railway engines, steam ships, telegraph etc.) which powered the evil capitalist Industrial Revolution that Mr Boyle abominates.

You may say that there wasn't time to include all these things, and of course that is right. But if there was space for the suffragettes and the Empire Windrush, The Beatles and the Arctic Monkeys, there was surely room for one or two of them.

And I'm afraid I can't agree with Mr Boyle that the modern NHS is such a wonderful organisation. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Yes, a Brilliant Show and Danny Boyle's a Genius. but Why Have So Many Been Taken in by His Marxist Propaganda?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.