Obama Wins, Polls Lose; Surveys Give a Slanted View of the Electoral Landscape

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 2, 2012 | Go to article overview

Obama Wins, Polls Lose; Surveys Give a Slanted View of the Electoral Landscape


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Either President Obama is on track for a major electoral win in November, or there is something seriously wrong with most major polls.

The economy is the worst it's been in decades for a first-term president. Growth has virtually halted, unemployment is up and federal debt is off the charts. Consumer confidence is down, and people think the country is on the wrong track by a 2-to-1 margin. Mr. Obama, once called the most gifted political fundraiser of his generation, has been reduced to frantic appeals for cash. Republican challenger Mitt Romney, who is attracting more funds every cycle, is on track to claim the title of the billion-dollar man. Yet somehow, the media consensus is that the Obama campaign is not only ahead in the race, but increasing its lead.

The perception problem can be tracked to the polls. A series of surveys have shown Mr. Obama with support levels far beyond what one would expect given the state of the union. On Wednesday, the New York Times reported the results of a Quinnipiac University/CBS News/New York Times swing-state poll of likely voters showing that Mr. Obama hits the magic 50 percent mark against Gov. Mitt Romney among likely voters in Florida, Ohio and Pennsylvania, with wide support for his plan to hike federal income taxes on upper-income voters. The poll has Mr. Obama up six points in Florida and Ohio and 11 in Pennsylvania. That would spell a handy win for the incumbent.

On the same day, Gallup reported that Mr. Obama's approval ratings among registered voters in those states were 44-46 percent, a range that also includes solid red states like Georgia and Mississippi. There are some problems comparing the two surveys: likely versus registered voters, and voting support versus mere approval. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Obama Wins, Polls Lose; Surveys Give a Slanted View of the Electoral Landscape
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.