Romney Is No Racist; Obama's Media Loyalists Hurl a Hurtful Insult

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

Romney Is No Racist; Obama's Media Loyalists Hurl a Hurtful Insult


Byline: Jeffrey T. Kuhner, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

President Obama is on track to lose his re-election. The economic recovery has stalled. Growth is anemic. Jobless claims are rising. Unemployment is high. More than 23 million Americans are either unemployed or underemployed. Trillion-dollar budget deficits have pushed the country to the financial brink. Mr. Obama's economic tenure has been marked by colossal failure. Hence, the Democratic Party's media allies are desperately trying to demonize his presidential rival, hoping to distract voters from Mr. Obama's dismal record. Their goal: paint Mr. Romney as the second coming of David Duke.

Mr. Obama is an anti-capitalist leftist who champions a European-style social democratic agenda. The essence of his collectivist (and anti-American) worldview was revealed during his recent speech deriding entrepreneurs, claiming they didn't build their businesses - government did. In an article in New York magazine, Jonathan Chait argues that a Romney ad criticizing Mr. Obama's remarks is not just false, but racist. Why? According to Mr. Chait, the president is shown while delivering his remarks as being angry, and he's talking not in his normal voice but in a 'black dialect.' Hence, because Mr. Obama supposedly spoke in a black dialect, the ad is a form of subtle white racism, which makes the president appear outside the mainstream.

This strikes at the core of Obama's entire political identity: a soft-spoken, reasonable African-American with a Kansas accent, Mr. Chait writes. From the moment he stepped onto the national stage, Obama's deepest political fear was being seen as a 'traditional' black politician, one who was demanding redistribution from white America on behalf of his fellow African-Americans.

Mr. Chait should be ashamed. Only a leftist obsessed with race and identity politics could possibly find anything offensive with the Romney ad. It accurately depicts Mr. Obama's words and meaning - his class warfare, belief in statism and contempt for the private sector. For years, liberals have insisted that opposition to Mr. Obama is driven by racism. In particular, they charge conservative claims that he is radical and un-American are simply code for black. The problem with Mr. Obama is not - and never has been - the color of his skin. Rather, it is the color of his politics: socialist red. He is a product of the academic left, the arrogant faculty loungers who despise Middle America. This is why Mr. Obama's you didn't build that comment sparked a public firestorm. His alleged black dialect has nothing to do with it.

Playing the race card, however, is all liberals have left. On his recent foreign trip, Mr. Romney made an obvious point: Culture is indispensable to a nation's economic success. He said this in a speech in Jerusalem, contrasting Israel's prosperity and economic dynamism with the widespread squalor and poverty of the Palestinian territories. …

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