The Man Who Dared to Tell the Truth about the Charlatans of Modern Art

Daily Mail (London), August 9, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Man Who Dared to Tell the Truth about the Charlatans of Modern Art


Byline: by Harry Mount

PRETENTIOUS pedlars of junk masquerading as art can breathe a little easier today, for the voice of one of their greatest foes has been stilled.

To the very end, the writer Robert Hughes argued brilliantly that, where much modern art was concerned, the emperor had no clothes.

The Australian, who has died at 74 after a long illness, saw the Damien Hirsts and Tracey Emins of the modern art world as fly-by-night con artists, unencumbered by skill, who floated to the top of their profession on a sea of money supported by a cabal of critics, curators and art investors.

'Hirst is basically a pirate,' Hughes wrote of our richest living artist before a recordsetting [euro]140million auction of the artist's work at Sotheby's in London in 2008.

'His skill is shown by the way in which he has managed to bluff so many art-related people (from museum personnel to billionaires in the New York real-estate trade) into giving credence to his originality and the importance of his "ideas".'

Hughes -- a burly mountain of a man, said by one fellow countryman to resemble a 'brick dunny', or outhouse -- held no truck with the nebulous realm of 'concept art'. He believed artists should make things, should draw, paint, build and carve, and do those things well.

Sadly, it seemed to Hughes as if, all too often, those people dominating the powerful positions in the art world, and pulling the strings of the art market, had been deluded into thinking otherwise.

It is a favourite trick of such fools to dismiss someone like Hughes as an old fogey -- as they also do to the brilliant Brian Sewell of the London Evening Standard, one of the last surviving critics in Hughes's mould, who really knows his stuff and is not prepared to yield to the passing idiocies of fashion.

Hughes knew the difference between good modern art and rubbish modern art, and he really let rip -- in glorious, beautiful, thundering prose -- when it came to pointing out the vast difference between the two.

He made his name with the book and TV series The Shock Of The New, which described the progress of modern art from the end of the 19th century to the end of the 20th.

Hughes explained why Picasso mattered and translated the alien dreamscapes of the Surrealists into language everyone could understand.

He was a tremendous fan of much modern art of the last century or so, but he diagnosed a sudden and steep falling-off in quality in the 1970s, with the emerging fashion for avantgarde works of minimal skill. He believed that something had gone horrifically wrong in the last 40 years, as a result of what he called 'the appalling commercialisation of the art world'.

Money had become the driving force -- and those with too much of it often have too little taste.

'Most of the time they [the rich art investors] buy what other people buy,' Hughes wrote. 'They move in great schools, like bluefish, all identical. There is safety in numbers.'

Not surprisingly he triggered a backlash. For the power brokers of modern art are a notoriously touchy, defensive bunch. But Hughes couldn't have cared less. He dismissed personal attacks by saying: 'As far as I can make out, when an artist says that I am conservative, it means I haven't praised him recently.'

Damien Hirst was his bete noire. Hughes damned the Briton's work as 'both simpleminded and sensationalist', remarking acidly of Hirst's infamous dead shark suspended in a tank of formaldehyde: 'One might as well get excited about seeing a dead halibut on a slab in Harrods food hall. …

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