The Real UN Agenda & the Rio+20 Summit Unmasked: The Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development Has Run Its Course, but Its Plans - on Abortion, Property Rights, Energy Usage, and Personal Consumption - Go On

By Newman, Alex | The New American, July 23, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Real UN Agenda & the Rio+20 Summit Unmasked: The Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development Has Run Its Course, but Its Plans - on Abortion, Property Rights, Energy Usage, and Personal Consumption - Go On


Newman, Alex, The New American


RIO DE JANEIRO-During the United Nations Rio+20 Conference on Sustainable Development in late June, Christ the Redeemer--the city's most famous landmark, a massive statue of Jesus Christ on top of Corcovado mountain overlooking Rio--was illuminated using bright green lights. It was a fitting symbol for the controversial summit in more ways than one.

Shortly before the conference began, green legend James Lovelock--the scientist and environmentalist who first came up with the whole "Gaia" concept--warned that the "green religion" was now "taking over from the Christian religion" While it may sound absurd to most Americans, for many Rio+20 summit participants, the stunt with green lights shining on the statue of Christ no doubt had a special meaning.

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UN critics and many Christians, at least, were outraged. Lord Christopher Monckton, a policy advisor to former U.K. Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and one of the most well-known opponents of the UN's supposed environmental agenda, called it "a kind of childish message that the environmental religion is now replacing Christianity." According to Lord Monckton, those who have lost the "true faith" nevertheless felt the need for religion and a common bond between themselves--and thought they had found it "in the spurious nostrums of Marxist environmentalism."

The Agenda

According to the UN, the summit was about making the world more " sustainable," Of course, there are literally hundreds of definitions of that term. Critics, including prominent environmentalists, say "sustainability" has largely become meaningless--it can be whatever somebody wants it to be. And that was evident throughout the conference. When asked by THE NEW AMERICAN, no two respondents offered the same vision. Instead, each activist and delegate essentially saw the term as a way to advance his or her own agenda. So, if "sustainability" means anything or nothing, what was the conference really about?

The Players: For starters, it helps to look at who was running the show. The Secretary-General of Rio+20 was a notorious anti-American Chinese Communist known as Sha Zukang, a man who spent decades working for the mass-murdering regime ruling over mainland China before starting his career as a senior UN official.He has openly proclaimed his hatred of Americans. And the fact that he gave an award to the Chinese general responsible for the mass slaughter of protesters at Tiananmen Square offers even more insight into his character.

The executive coordinator of the Rio+20 summit, meanwhile, was French socialist Brice Lalonde, a reliable advocate of bigger and more centralized government.

Finally, the other Rio+20 executive coordinator was a little-known "green" activist and former government minister from Barbados named Elizabeth Thompson. In interviews, she spoke of building partnerships between governments and other players "non-governmental" organizations and big business--to create what she called "Earth Incorporated." The UN, of course, would guide the whole process.

The Reports: A report prepared by some three dozen UN agencies entitled "Working Towards a Balanced and Inclusive Green Economy: A United Nations System-wide Perspective," for example, detailed the scheme to foist a "green" world order on the planet by making every level of government--regional, national, subnational, and local--subservient to the agenda.

According to the document, the transition toward a global "green economy" was expected to cost trillions of dollars per year.Every aspect of human life--lifestyles, opinions, behavior, education, health, consumption, production, agriculture, diet, law, taxation, industry, governance, and more--would have to be reshaped to conform to new international standards.Certain Communist Chinese policies were described as a "good example."

"Specifically, in a transition to a green economy, public policies will need to be used strategically to reorient consumption, investments, and other economic activities," the document explained of the UN's desired central-planning schemes, touting the reduction of carbon emissions and new educational programs to teach humanity why it must become what the UN considers sustainable. …

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