St. Johns School Board

The Florida Times Union, August 5, 2012 | Go to article overview

St. Johns School Board


DISTRICT 2

TOMMY ALLEN

Age: 67

Education: Certified and master board-trained in school finance and law, curriculum instruction, communications and public relations, multicultural/diversity education, community and family involvement, legislation and administration process, planning and overview, conflict resolution, board/superintendent relations

Qualifications: St. Johns County School Board member for 24 years.

Merit pay is nearing. How will school districts be able to fund merit pay, particularly in St. Johns County where many teachers are expected to qualify? There is currently no state funding source for performance pay. All districts are expected to modify their salary schedule to meet the requirements of the law. We will be working closely with our teachers union to accomplish this task.

St. Johns County is the No. 1 school district in the state. What will you do to improve it? We are constantly looking for areas to improve. Our continuous improvement process and strategic plan require us to regularly look at gaps between where we are and where we strive to be. Our current success and consistent growth in all areas are a testament to a process that works in helping us to get better every year. Our mission will never be complete until all our children are achieving at their maximum potential.

RONALD STAFFORD

Age: 62

Education: Attended Edward Waters College; St. Augustine's College, Raleigh, N.C.; University of Alabama, Huntsville; Valencia College, Orlando

Qualifications: Lifelong resident of St. Johns County, retired from the Florida Department of Law Enforcement.

Merit pay is nearing. How will school districts be able to fund merit pay, particularly in St. Johns County where many teachers are expected to qualify? During the year merit pay was put into law, the lawmakers did not fund merit pay but left it up to the counties to fund. The School Board should have set up a line item to cover it. With the number of teachers retiring, those salaries should be used to cover or partially cover merit pay.

St. Johns County is the No. 1 school district in the state. What will you do to improve it? To stay No. 1, we must empower our teachers by allowing them to teach and have control of their classrooms. Administrators and teachers should be involved in creating the best curriculum for the individual school or classroom. Then all students should graduate with a diploma.

DISTRICT 5

PATRICK T. CANAN

Age: 56

Education: Bachelor's degree, J.D., University of Florida

Qualifications: Three children in our public school system, active community leader, former substitute teacher and adjunct college professor, local business owner, 22-year county resident, member of St. Johns County School District's Strategic Planning Core Team

Merit pay is nearing. How will school districts be able to fund merit pay, particularly in St. Johns County where many teachers are expected to qualify? We have the highest-performing school district in the state so, of course, many of our teachers will qualify for merit pay, and they deserve to be compensated. But all of our teachers should be fairly compensated, not just those receiving merit pay. Teachers have not received raises in a long time and many are frustrated. …

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