Our Heritage Areas Should Be Shared, Not Sealed Away

The Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Australia), August 18, 2012 | Go to article overview

Our Heritage Areas Should Be Shared, Not Sealed Away


SEVEN years ago, a developer came to our region with a grand plan to redevelop Great Keppel Island.

Like anyone who buys an investment that turns out to be losing lots of money, the developer looked at the options and decided to close the existing resort. They decided to redevelop the island because the resort needed a makeover badly. Perhaps the way they closed the resort wasn't the best, but they did what they had to do.

For more than two years this development has had a shop frontage, telephone hotline, website and email address. During this time there have only been about two people drop in and less than 10 phone calls and emails. Maybe everyone else took the time to read the 5000+ page EIS which cost more than $6 million. Those who are against it have been invited to talk one-on-one with the scientists, planners and engineers involved in the research of the island, but they have all declined. Instead of proactively seeking more information, the anti-GKI protestors hide behind a computer and fight on the internet with their fake profiles, spreading lies to their friends, some living overseas, to join their C[pounds sterling]save GKI for themselvesC[yen] campaign. What an insult to the progress of our region. A Newspoll Survey of the region (which was conducted using survey questions signed off by the State Government as not leading or bias) found that 85% of people want to see this proposed development go ahead. …

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Our Heritage Areas Should Be Shared, Not Sealed Away
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