`Spoilers' in Our Midst Call for Vigilance: Myths Survive Desecration by Eco-Vandals

By Bedford, William | Anglican Journal, January 2002 | Go to article overview

`Spoilers' in Our Midst Call for Vigilance: Myths Survive Desecration by Eco-Vandals


Bedford, William, Anglican Journal


MY FRIEND Harry was somewhere in his late 70s when he died. He didn't know the exact year of his birth because his records were lost in a fire on his reserve when he was a baby. When Harry departed for the Happy Hunting Grounds (politically incorrect or not, that's how my native-Canadian friend always referred to the hereafter) I lost more than an old friend; I also lost a storehouse of Canadiana. After a day's fishing, Harry and I would sit out on his cottage verandah drinking beer, and shooting the breeze until bedtime. I did most of the listening because Harry loved to reminisce and I, being about 40 years his junior, loved to hear about things that happened long before I was born.

Whenever Harry heard his fellow cottagers recalling the good old days, those, so-called, simpler times, he would just nod without comment. But I always knew what he was thinking, as he listened to them recounting happy memories from their youth. You see, Harry's childhood memories were a far cry from that of his neighbors. Their good old times, as Harry told it to me, weren't all that great for people like him.

In those olden times that Harry's neighbours recalled through a nostalgic mist, only the culture of certain groups was protected. The culture of other groups, especially Harry's own native culture, was considered of little account by the rulers of the land, at that time. One tragic incident that befell Harry's community in those simpler times was the day the Spoilers came to his village and destroyed its Sacred Hill.

Harry had such bitter memories of that incident that he must have told me about it 100 times, over the years. I think of Harry's Sacred Hill whenever some controversial environmental issue, like dumping Toronto's garbage in Kirkland Lake, Ont., makes the evening news.

Here is Harry's tale. The tribal elders always spoke of the Hill in reverential tones. It was, they said, a storehouse of tribal memory, that for 1,000 years before the white man came, was revered as the final resting place of the great warrior spirits.

As a child, Harry had been taught in the church school, that to everything there is a season, and Harry considered the Hill, a place for all seasons. …

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