Students Set for a Shock as CAO Points Shoot Up

Daily Mail (London), August 20, 2012 | Go to article overview

Students Set for a Shock as CAO Points Shoot Up


Byline: Elaine Loughlin

LEAVING Cert students are facing huge disappointment this morning after CAO requirements for many thirdlevel courses soared - some by as many as 85 points.

Increased demand for places and the granting of 25 bonus points for students who passed higher level maths have pushed subjects out of the reach of many college hopefuls when they might have comfortably landed the place in previous years.

Interest in science and IT in particular has seen these courses take a large points leap.

Applicants are also facing increased competition from UK students, who are choosing to study in Irish universities to avoid being faced with crippling fees of up [pounds sterling]9,000 ([euro]11,500) per year at home.

The numbers applying from Britain and Northern Ireland in the past two years have shot up by almost 24 per cent.

Science and technology courses have seen some of the biggest points rises this year, with many students hoping to take advantage of the booming smart economy.

Computer-aided engineering and design in the University of Limerick has rocketed from 410 points last year to 495 in the first round published today.

Computer science in UCD has risen to 470 from 410, while biological and biomedical sciences at NUI Maynooth has increased by has increased to 460 from 435.

First preferences for honours degrees in science rose 17.4 per cent this year, meaning not all students will receive their preferred course option today. However, employers' group IBEC has welcomed the increased demand for science and technology courses, saying the sector will help rebuild our economy.

IBEC's Tony Donohoe said: 'We are beginning to attract more high calibre students into subjects for which we are likely to see a demand from industry into the foreseeable future.'

Overall, the points needed to get into courses - including those outside the science and IT areas - have gone up. Some are blaming the additional 25 points given to those who passed honours maths for distorting the CAO points system.

For example, students who want to study history at Trinity College will need 490 points, whereas they required 475 in the first round last year.

Commerce with French in NUI Galway has increased by 20 points, from 475 to 495 and product design in DIT has gone up to 395 from 370.

But the points needed for Architecture and other construction-related courses have fallen as students shy away from the building industry.

Primary teaching has also seen a small drop this year. Those looking to get into St Patrick's in Drumcondra need five points fewer than last year to secure a place, while the points for Gaeltacht applicants has dropped by ten.

Students may have shunned the primary teaching because of reductions in starting salaries and the difficulty newly qualified teachers now have in finding a full-time jobs.

Of the 65,657 who applied to the CAO (including Leaving Cert students and mature students), 52,546 have received offers today. However, those who have yet to get an offer may be successful in the second round on August 30.

Competition is also increasing from foreign students and the numbers of people applying to the CAO from Britain and Northern Ireland has increased significantly for a second year. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Students Set for a Shock as CAO Points Shoot Up
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.