Canadian Feminist Periodicals, 1998

Resources for Feminist Research, Annual 2000 | Go to article overview

Canadian Feminist Periodicals, 1998


Atlantis

Patricia Elliot. "Some Critical Reflections on the Transgender Theory of Kate Bornstein." Atlantis, vol. 23, no. 1 (Fall/Winter 1998), pp. 13-19.

This article critically engages aspects of Kate Bornstein's transgender theory as found in Gender Outlaw. Drawing on recent work in Lacanian psychoanalysis, and on insights from Bornstein's account, Elliot poses questions about the ways in which sex, gender, desire, and subjectivity are theorized. (Journal abstract)

Tania Trepenier. "Valuing Narratives of Hybridity and Multiplicity." Atlantis, vol. 23, no. 1 (Fall/Winter 1998), pp. 20-29.

By providing parallel critiques of US Third World feminism and radical lesbian feminism from the perspective of bisexual feminists and feminists of mixed race, ethnicity, and culture, the author argues that theories concerned with power, privilege, and social change would benefit from a valuation of narratives of hybridity and multiplicity. (Journal abstract)

Christine Overall. "`Peep Shows and Bedroom Access': Women's Identities and the Practice of Outing." Atlantis, vol. 23, no. 1 (Fall/Winter 1998), pp. 30-37.

"Passing" may be defined as the concealment of a stigmatized identity, often through the assumption of a counterpart non-stigmatized identity. "Outing" is the practice of revealing the passing of persons with stigmatized identities. Focussing on a variety of stigmatized identities usually or invariably possessed by and/or attributed to women, the author raises moral questions about the practice of outing by means of an ontological and epistemological critique of some of the assumptions on which outing is based. (Journal abstract)

Cynthia Mathieson and Lynda Endicott. "Lesbian and Bisexual Identity: Discourse of Difference." Atlantis, vol. 23, no. 1 (Fall/Winter 1998), pp. 38-47.

How does a lesbian or bisexual woman construct her identity? The authors examine this question through a discourse analysis of 20 interviews with lesbian and bisexual women. They theorize about the discursive production of identities using three broad classifications of discourse: "Labelling," "Coming Out," and "Building and Sustaining Identity." (Journal abstract)

Becki Ross. "`Down At the Wherehouse?': Reflections on Christian Community Service and Female Sex Deviance at Toronto's Street Haven, 1965-1969." Atlantis, vol. 23, no. 1 (Fall/Winter 1998), pp. 48-59.

This paper focusses on Street Haven, a drop-in centre that opened in Toronto, Ontario in 1965 to service female ex-offenders and street women, the majority of whom were lesbians, drug users, and prostitutes. Interviews and archival materials reveal how white, middle-class Haven volunteers endeavoured to improve the lives of "the girls" in the interests of "normal" womanhood. At the same time, stories told by volunteers complicate notions of societal norms unilaterally imposed by Christian "do-gooders" on "deviant" subjects. (Journal abstract)

Pamela J. Downe. "Selling Sex, Studying Sexuality: Voices of Costs Rican Prostitutes and Visions of Feminists." Atlantis, vol. 23, no. 1 (Fall/Winter 1998), pp. 60-68.

This paper explores the images of disembodiment and disengagement put forth in feminist representations of prostitution and prostitutes and contrasts them to the embodied and engaged experiences of 53 street prostitutes in San Jose, Costa Rica. The importance of focussing on the global as well as local context is emphasized. (Journal abstract)

Caroline Fusco. "Setting the Record Straight: The Experiences of Lesbian Athletes," Atlantis, vol. 23, no. 1 (Fall/Winter 1998), pp. 69-79.

In her master's thesis, "Lesbians and Locker Rooms," Caroline Fusco interviewed eight lesbian athletes and concluded that lesbian realities in sport can be connected to a larger set of practices which assist in the construction of a heteronormative order. In this paper she has reinterpreted previous interview material in order to examine the performances of both (homo/hetero)sexual identities in their sports in relation to this heteronormative order. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Canadian Feminist Periodicals, 1998
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.