What Century Did You Say?

Anglican Journal, February 2000 | Go to article overview

What Century Did You Say?


100 years ago: February 1900

Canadian Churchman reported that it is curious to see how people still doubt as to whether we are now ending the 19th Century or beginning the 20th. Even the Archbishop of Canterbury has been appealed to on the subject. In a letter to a lay Churchman, His Grace says, "that all historians have dated events on the supposition that the year 1, and not the year 0, is the year in which our Lord was born, and it is now too late to alter it. Therefore the year 1900 is the last year of the 19th Century, and not the first year of the 20th." This question we decided, on simple grounds of reason, some weeks ago, as the Archbishop has decided it, and we cannot imagine any other decision possible.

50 years ago: February 1950

Canadian Churchman reported that the government approved, non-profit service known as CARE has issued through its Ottawa representative an interesting statement providing a few particulars of what has been accomplished in four years. Nine million packages of food and textiles have been shipped to needy people in Europe and Asia. Ninety-four per cent of these contained food. The value of the total is placed at $88,000,000. CARE comprises 25 major welfare agencies ... Thomas Massey of the English House of Commons moved that the word Mass be abolished from the English language and that with the words ending in -mas or -mass the syllable -tide be substituted, as for example Christide, Michaetide, etc. …

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