Born Again Berlin; MICHAEL MCHUGH CHECKS OUT THE CONTINUED RENAISSANCE OF THE GERMAN CAPITAL

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), August 25, 2012 | Go to article overview

Born Again Berlin; MICHAEL MCHUGH CHECKS OUT THE CONTINUED RENAISSANCE OF THE GERMAN CAPITAL


* IP and trendy have been common buzz words for Berlin for years now, and the city's art scene has no doubt played a large part. On the other hand, it's the German capital's intense and rich history that draws in many visitors.

Though more than 20 years have passed since the fall of the Wall separating East and West, and more than six decades since the days of Hitler, Berlin's past remains etched across the city - stark reminders of the atrocities and frustrations suffered, as well as symbols of the hope of generations that have emerged since.

Two key elements of an eclectic, cosmopolitan city - but they're far from separate entities. Berlin's art and history are inevitably deeply intertwined, and this is a continuing journey.

Earlier this year, following a EUR5m renovation project, a former Jewish girl's school reopened as an arts centre. The school had not long been built before it was seized during the Nazi occupation in the early Thirties. The building was later returned to the Jewish community, but stood empty for years.

Now, the Haus der Kunst und Esskultur (House of Art and Dining Culture) has been transformed into a space for all, featuring galleries and restaurants, with works by the likes of Andy Warhol.

It sits in the Mitte district, an area only recently repopulated. It's also home to Berlin Zoo, with shiny new shops and department stores lining the main streets.

Art is such an attraction in Berlin that new tour company Go Art! Berlin is offering bespoke trips around the city's highlights.

These include neighbourhood and street art, such as the colourful graffiti emblazoned across much of the city, which plays a central role in Berlin's expressive, Bohemian character.

The highlights don't end there, though.

Filling a weekend break in Berlin is easy - the challenge is choosing what to see and what to skip.

The Clarchens Ballhaus, a dance hall which opened in 1913, is well worth a look. Its cracked mirrors and green peeling paint display the dilapidated grandeur of the Roaring Twenties.

It's also home to the Gipsy Restaurant, where you can tuck into delicious wiener schnitzel while listening to live music.

Berlin's public transport system is well set up for tourists.

There's the tram, underground, trains and buses to choose from, but by far the most pleasant way to get around the city's broad boulevards on balmy summer or crisp autumn days is cycling. Most of the roads have very decent cycling lanes, and motorists are very used to the hundreds of bike-riders whizzing along every day. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Born Again Berlin; MICHAEL MCHUGH CHECKS OUT THE CONTINUED RENAISSANCE OF THE GERMAN CAPITAL
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.