Republican Party Platform Best Yet; Reagan's Three-Legged Stool Upheld

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 28, 2012 | Go to article overview

Republican Party Platform Best Yet; Reagan's Three-Legged Stool Upheld


Byline: Phyllis Schlafly, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Republican Party platform may be the best one ever adopted. The party has long since learned that fiscal, social and sovereignty issues cannot be ignored or separated, but must be addressed as all part of a national campaign.

The media may have forgotten (or chosen to forget) that Ronald Reagan's big victories, including his 49-state victory in 1984, were based on a three-legged stool of dealing directly with all three clusters of issues.

The 2012 platform adopted the identical pro-life language that has been in the platform since the late Rep. Henry Hyde inserted it in 1984 in Dallas. It affirms that the unborn child has a fundamental individual right to life which cannot be infringed.

In sharp contrast to the anticipated Democratic Party platform, the Republican platform takes a strong stand in support of marriage as the union of one man and one woman and of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). The platform specifically opposes any changes made by an activist judiciary or by a president who swore an oath to take care that the laws be faithfully executed.

The platform speaks loud and clear against the Obama administration's war on religion, which is trying to compel faith-related institutions, as well as believing individuals, to contravene their deeply held religious, moral or ethical beliefs regarding health services, traditional marriage or abortion. This war is an unprecedented attack on the First Amendment and on religiously affiliated institutions such as hospitals, schools and colleges, forcing them to accept the Obama administration's rule that there is no higher power than the executive branch of the federal government. The penalty for violating the mandate uses the Supreme Court's new approval of the federal government's unlimited power to tax. Employers who reject the mandate will be hit with a tax of $2,000 per employee per year, a sure road to bankruptcy.

Of course, the platform calls for repealing Obamacare, identifying it as not really about health care. …

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Republican Party Platform Best Yet; Reagan's Three-Legged Stool Upheld
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