Judge to Speak at Elmhurst College

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 28, 2012 | Go to article overview

Judge to Speak at Elmhurst College


Byline: Elmhurst College submission Elmhurst College submission

Judge Richard A. Posner of the U.S. Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago is one of the most influential judges outside the Supreme Court, as well as a prolific jurist-academic who has written nearly 40 books on topics ranging from economics and jurisprudence to terrorism and sex.

Posner will discuss "The Crisis of Capitalist Democracy" during an appearance Thursday, Sept. 6, at Elmhurst College, turning what The New York Times calls his "indefatigable intellect" to the ongoing economic crisis and the efforts of the "cumbersome, clotted, competence-challenged" American system of government to respond to it.

The event is part of the annual Rudolf G. Schade Lecture Series and is sponsored in part by BMO Harris Bank.

An appellate judge since 1981, Posner long has been known as one of the nation's most respected legal thinkers on the right. But he recently made headlines for a National Public Radio interview in which he said he has become frustrated with the modern Republican Party.

While expressing admiration for President Ronald Reagan and the economist Milton Friedman, Posner said that over the past 10 years, "there's been a real deterioration in conservative thinking. And that has to lead people to re-examine and modify their thinking. …

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Judge to Speak at Elmhurst College
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