Don't Let Socialists Win; Time to Ring the Liberty Bell

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), August 30, 2012 | Go to article overview

Don't Let Socialists Win; Time to Ring the Liberty Bell


Byline: Ted Nugent, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The Republican and Democratic national conventions have the country thinking about the state of our increasingly socialistic government. Britain's Iron Lady, Margaret Thatcher, hit the bull's-eye when she said, The trouble with socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money. She, like the truth, rocks.

President Obama and numerous other Fedzillacrats obviously think the Iron Lady's words were full of rust. They would be wrong, as usual.

The root of evil is not the want of money, but rather a government that thinks it knows better than free-thinking individuals how best to provide for our well-being. Socialists like our president use the law and courts to force their failed big-government ideas on those of us still helplessly drunk on freedom, rugged individualism and liberty. You know, the American way.

Socialists argue that fairness is the goal. For their version of fairness to occur, socialists must take the earnings and wealth from one person who earned it and give it to another who has not. Karl Marx would be proud of Mr. Obama.

We would be wise to remember when then-Sen. Barack Obama was campaigning for the presidency and told Joe the Plumber, I think when you spread the wealth around, it's good for everybody. Those are the words of a socialist who learned his lessons well from his socialist upbringing and on the streets of Chicago as a community organizer.

We also would be wise to remember the words of then-Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi regarding her support of Obamacare: We have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it. Those are the words of a socialist scammer.

Socialists are punks who think they are smarter than ordinary Americans and that ordinary Americans are so dumb they need to be managed by Fedzillacrats in Washington. These punks are smug, arrogant and wrong.

What always has worked is more freedom and more liberty. The less government control over individuals and our businesses, the more individuals and America prospers. Duh!

America was born by freedom addicts who risked their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor to throw off the burdensome and heavy yolk of an abusive, soulless foreign power in order to launch an experiment in self-government. …

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