Picture Perfect: Managing the Employment Lifecycle with Talent Management Software

By Patton, Carol | University Business, July-August 2012 | Go to article overview

Picture Perfect: Managing the Employment Lifecycle with Talent Management Software


Patton, Carol, University Business


Are the processes of recruiting, employee performance appraisals, recognition, and succession planning at your institution in separate pieces like a jigsaw puzzle? Or are they linked, forming one clear picture about your campus's talent resources and needs?

Talent management software is helping campus HR professionals connect the pieces to develop a more accurate picture of employees' abilities and skill gaps--and in some cases even changing the way HR operates.

Employees can share work experiences online or praise coworkers, drawing HR's attention. Managers can post ongoing comments about an employee's performance, which that employee can reference for up-to-date feedback on what skills may need sharpening. Other software ties employee performance to reward and recognition programs and the school's goals. The technology all supports the goal of efficiently managing the employment lifecycle.

In 2008, the housing and food services division at Purdue University (Ind.) began exploring various software focused on everything from onboarding and professional development to goal setting. Initially, the division converted its manual performance appraisal system to a rudimentary online process, but "had the sense" that more than just a performance appraisal tool was needed, explains Dave Jones, organizational effectiveness specialist in the division at Purdue, which employs roughly 800 employees.

"I couldn't even spell talent management before," jokes Jones, adding that historically, each process was independent of the others.

Now, using five components of The Halogen Talent Management Suite, HR runs reports to review employee competency scores and develops competency-based and targeted skills training. Performance appraisals are year-round, rather than annual. Managers can also track each employee's accomplishments, skill gaps, goals, and professional development plan, all online and in one spot.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"Employees in the past would have said, 'Performance management is something that is done to me,'" says Jones, noting that everyone now participates in the process. "It really does elevate that partnership between manager and employee in the employee development process. It connects the dots in so many ways."

LINKED AND LEVERAGED

In the past, HR at some schools operated in silos. Compensation fell under finance. Learning and recruitment weren't part of HR. "If you're trying to drive a talent management program throughout organization and successful talent strategy, each one of the touch points or talent programs needs to be coordinated, in sync and aligned not only with [each other], but the higher purpose of the organization," says Donna Ronayne, vice president of marketing and business development at Halogen Software.

To help schools achieve this connectivity, the company has introduced a component in its performance tool called "Feedback Central." Managers use it to document observations about employee performance or accomplishments year-round, which employees can later read. Ronayne believes it will evolve into a social feedback tool where employees will enter comments about their colleagues, even rate their performance.

While the tool will require checks and balances to avoid unwarranted comments, she says this type of software is helping fuel a new trend--creating a more transparent talent management world. It will help minimize employee favoritism, give employees the raises they deserve, and guide managers to rate employees fairly based on their competencies, skills, and performance.

Vendors are also automating other HR processes for identifying current and future talent gaps, employee retention, analytics, and reporting capabilities.

In 2010, Nobscot Corp. added a new component to its cloud-based software, called Quality of Hire, that focuses on surveying supervisors of new hires to gain information about how to retain them, explains Beth N. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Picture Perfect: Managing the Employment Lifecycle with Talent Management Software
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.