Quebec Aspirations Pulled by Nationalism, Free Markets and Globalization

By Morton, Desmond | Canadian Speeches, March-April 2001 | Go to article overview

Quebec Aspirations Pulled by Nationalism, Free Markets and Globalization


Morton, Desmond, Canadian Speeches


"TEXT 1778.","Canadian Speeches: Volume 15, #01, March/April 2001.","DESMOND MORTON.","Director, McGill Institute for the Study of Canada.","Quebec aspirations pulled by nationalism, free markets and globalization.","Quebec (province). Nationalism. Market economy. Globalization.","The forces of nationalism, free market liberalism, globalization, and prosperity, pull on the political aspirations of Quebeckers. Most want to be both Quebeckers and Canadians in a compact of equality with English-speaking Canada. But a recession could change attitudes. Speech delivered at Kensington Place, Montreal, February 12, 2001."," In the 1990s, we have endured two powerful ideologies, free market liberalism and nationalism. We have seen them work out their distinct destinies in globalization of markets and communications; and we have seen nationalism in Kosovo, Rwanda, Shri Lanka, and beyond. And we have lived with it here.

The earlier nationalism of Henri Bourassa had told Quebeckers, like other Canadians, to sever their loyalty from Europe and find a new and purely Canadian identity. His successor and rival, Abbe Lionel Groulx, preached a narrower loyalty to a conservative, Catholic Laurentie, with its back to 20th century materialism and secularism. This was the mindset of Maurice Duplesis, a premier whose long rule defined Quebec for many other Canadians and for old-fashioned nationalists.

In 1960, when the province voted for Jean Lesage and the Liberals in 1960, the unexpected result was to shrug off the dominance of both Catholic clericalism and the English-speaking economic elite. Like most slogans, "The Quiet Revolution" was a lie. Transforming Quebec was not a silent process and it was achieved largely by using the Quebec state as a forceful instrument of collective will -- such as Rene Levesque's nationalization of Hydro power. In the process, Quebeckers learned, the state could do almost anything, but only in Quebec.

BUT, Levesque soon insisted, if Quebec became as sovereign as scores of ex-colonies, its national state could do anything anywhere. It was an intoxicating message that for some led to the crisis of 1970 -- or to the relentless bargaining by Robert Bourassa for a "profitable Confederation" and 100,000 new jobs. Some Quebeckers found the attraction of strong unions, economic justice, universal social security. To this day, this is one of sovereignty's strongest appeals. Others, like Charles Sirois of Teleglobe and Bernard Lamarre of Lavalin, demonstrated "un gout des affaires" which earlier nationalists had specifically denied. Brilliantly-led firms like Bombardier and la Cirque du soleil, aided by the famous Caisse de Depots, built on Quebeckers' compulsory pension savings, have linked Quebec's economy to the world.

This is the history of your lifetime. If you have been Quebeckers, you have helped shape that history, you have been shaped by it and sometimes, if you are anglophones, you may have wondered whether it has anything to do with you. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Quebec Aspirations Pulled by Nationalism, Free Markets and Globalization
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.