School at Home or Homeschooling? the Trend of Educating Children at Home Is Blossoming, but Not All Available Curricula Are Created Equal. to Reach Desired Outcomes, Parents Need to Choose Carefully

By Bohon, Dave | The New American, August 20, 2012 | Go to article overview

School at Home or Homeschooling? the Trend of Educating Children at Home Is Blossoming, but Not All Available Curricula Are Created Equal. to Reach Desired Outcomes, Parents Need to Choose Carefully


Bohon, Dave, The New American


0ver the past several years an educational phenomenon has been exploding across America. Fed up with the homogenized, secular indoctrination; embrace of dysfunctional and sexualized behavior; and tolerance for rebellious and unruly children that largely define public education in the United States, an increasing number of parents are pulling their kids out of the local schools and opting instead for a home education plan.

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According to Dr. Brian Ray of the National Home Education Research Institute (NHERI), as of 2010 there were, by best estimates, over two million homeschooled students ages five to 18 in the United States, with the population of home educated students growing by up to six percent every year. While the reasons parents choose to teach their kids at home may vary, what is clear is that homeschooled kids outshine their public-schooled counterparts on just about every level.

Home-educated students typically score 15 to 30 points above public-school students on standardized achievement tests--and they do so regardless of their parents' level of formal education. These taught-at-home students also typically score above the average on the SAT and ACT tests colleges use for admission--which means that most universities love having them, and in many cases actively recruit them. And while opponents warn that homeschooled students miss out on crucial opportunities for socialization provided in a public-school setting, the truth is that children educated at home typically score above average in tests of social, emotional, and psychological development.

Dr. Ray told THE NEW AMERICAN that increasingly parents throughout the United States are turning toward home-based education because "they want solid academics for their children, values and worldview that they choose rather than what the state chooses, stronger family relationships, and individualized education rather than a one-size-fits-all system." He added that many concerned parents are fed up with the lax behavioral standards prevalent in most public schools.

Over the past 30 years, the traditional homeschool model has earned a reputation for providing the foundation many parents want for their children. With the help of private, free-market homeschool curriculums like A Beka, Bob Jones, A.C.E., and Alpha Omega--all with Christian foundations--tens of thousands of families raised a generation of Americans with solid academics, along with crucial scriptural training and the principles of Americanism that are essential to the nation's future.

As homeschooling gained widespread popularity throughout the 1990s, the public-education establishment found it increasingly difficult to stop the exodus of families seeking something better for their children. But with the introduction of online learning in the late 1990s, a core of education "entrepreneurs" suggested that, using the charter-school concept, public schools might just offer their own version of homeschooling that would allow students to fulfill all the requirements set by a district--but instead of going to a classroom they could use an online curriculum.

One of those entrepreneurs was former U.S. Education Secretary William Bennett, who in 1999 helped found a company called K12, which has gone on to be a leading player in what has become known as the "Virtual Academy." Companies like K 12 contract with school districts to provide curriculum and education consultants, in return reaping part of the local, state, and federal tax money that the district gets for each student. The families that sign on to these public-school virtual academies get "free homeschooling" for their kids--which typically includes "free" computers and other perks--while the school district retains the per-student monies it would have lost had those families gone with another homeschool option. It all sounds like a win-win scenario, right?

Wrong! …

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School at Home or Homeschooling? the Trend of Educating Children at Home Is Blossoming, but Not All Available Curricula Are Created Equal. to Reach Desired Outcomes, Parents Need to Choose Carefully
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