Of Party Platforms and Politics; Campaigns Set by Convention Documents

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 6, 2012 | Go to article overview

Of Party Platforms and Politics; Campaigns Set by Convention Documents


Byline: Tony Perkins, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Every four years, America's two major political parties gather separately for what easily can be dismissed as political pageantry. In the midst of speeches and soirees, each party sets a standard to which it will aspire and by which it will or should be judged.

As long as there have been political parties and political conventions, there has been a need for political platforms. They give the candidates a clear political position with which they can campaign. In a sense, the platform is a party's wish list that explains what, in a perfect situation, the party would like to accomplish. For outside organizations such as the Family Research Council (FRC), the platform provides a standard that can be used to measure candidates and elected officials. This is a standard ignored far too often, but effective when lobbying on various issues.

For the past two conventions, I worked with my colleagues at FRC Action, along with Phyllis Schlafly and her team, to help shape the platform. This year, however, because of concerns that the GOP might drift from its conservative principles, I served as a delegate from Louisiana on the platform committee.

The draft platform assembled under the leadership of Gov. Bob McDonald, the Republican National Committee and Mitt Romney's campaign was well-done. What my fellow delegates and I did was make a good document even better. On the issue of marriage, the plank was rewritten to make clear that marriage between one man and one woman is the foundation of civil society. Thanks to the research in FRC's MARRI project, I was well-equipped to point out that the best social program we can promote is a healthy marriage. Government policy shouldn't be formed that redefines what works.

Thanks to the hard work of Elaine Donnelly from the Center for Military Readiness, the Republican platform reflects the great debt we owe our nation's men and women in uniform. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Of Party Platforms and Politics; Campaigns Set by Convention Documents
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.