Antisemitism on the Campus: Past & Present

By Tuchman, Aryeh | American Jewish History, December 2010 | Go to article overview

Antisemitism on the Campus: Past & Present


Tuchman, Aryeh, American Jewish History


Antisemitism on the Campus: Past & Present. Edited by Eunice G. Pollack. Boston: Academic Studies Press, 2011. xxiv + 448 pp.

Given the book's focus on college campuses, it is not surprising that two-thirds of the essays in Antisemitism on Campus deal primarily with what is sometimes described as the "new anti-Semitism," in which Jews around the world are harassed, demonized and attacked by opponents of Israel for the alleged crimes of the "Jewish State." There is no shortage of anecdotal evidence that this type of antisemitism is particularly prevalent on campuses, and Antisemitism on the Campus is full of such accounts, with good discussions of antisemitic manifestations at institutions like Wellesley College, the University of California at Berkeley and Irvine, and Columbia University. Of course, this type of antisemitism had its genesis decades ago. Eunice G. Pollack, who also edits the volume, recounts its history, together with the history of other antisemitic themes, in African American groups dating back to the 1960s. Dave Rich's description of efforts by left-leaning student unions to ban Jewish and/or Zionist groups in Britain in the late 1970s is particularly good.

One would have hoped that in addition to these descriptive accounts, the book would have included some analysis of the full extent of the problem outside these known hotbeds of anti-Zionist activism. Anti-Zionist student activism may elide into antisemitism, and one may argue that the construction of mock "apartheid walls" or "checkpoints" by student groups effectively promotes antisemitism. But what percentage of campuses across the nation are home to a significant number of anti-Zionist student activists? On what percentage of campuses have such apartheid walls been constructed, and how many students did they affect? Alvin H. Rosenfeld posits that the problem of campus antisemitism appears to be largely "coastal"--that it appears most acutely on campuses in California and, to a lesser extent, in the Northeast. One would like to see any comparative data, one way or the other. Kenneth Lasson notes that the Anti-Defamation League tries to compile annual statistics on antisemitic incidents on college campuses, but these statistics are not comprehensive. In the end he, too, is forced to rely on narrative descriptions of known outbreaks rather than attempt to fashion a comprehensive assessment of the extent of the problem.

The lack of quality data on antisemitic attitudes and incidents is a problem for the field of antisemitism studies as a whole. Many watchdog groups and research organizations try to generate statistics based on newspaper accounts and voluntary reporting, sometimes using definitions that change from year to year and are always subject to the judgment of individual staffers. Polling can be expensive and is sometimes conducted by research firms without enough experience in the social sciences to craft high-quality surveys of societal attitudes and interpret the results. (By contrast, see the "Patterns in American Prejudice" series of studies sponsored by the Anti-Defamation League and conducted by the University of California in the 1960s and 1970s.)

The assumption that antisemitism on campuses is primarily of the anti-Zionist persuasion may explain the inclusion in this book of some essays that deal primarily with anti-Zionism outside the academy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Antisemitism on the Campus: Past & Present
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.