Technology Makes the Connection at Wake Forest: University Finds a Way to Bridge the Gap between Campuses

University Business, September 2012 | Go to article overview

Technology Makes the Connection at Wake Forest: University Finds a Way to Bridge the Gap between Campuses


Being some 90 miles away from Wake Forest University's sprawling main campus in Winston-Salem, the school's new satellite campus in uptown Charlotte could seem like a distant star to the students who attend its adjunct MBA program, but foresight and imagination have brought the two campuses culturally and technologically closer.

One of the main challenges in technologically connecting the two campuses involved space constraints. The office building that housed the handful of rooms that would become the Charlotte campus had only a few closets for audiovisual equipment. "Uptown real estate in Charlotte doesn't come cheap, and so there was limited space allotted for audiovisual use," says John Owen, director of technology at Wake Forest University. "We were in dire need of a small rack-mounted control system that could be installed in each closet location or audiovisual credenza."

What became the cornerstone of the Charlotte installation was a newly designed, all-in-one controller developed by AMX. "The Enova DVX-3150 offered a more affordable all-in-one solution, while freeing up space needed for the rest of the classroom audiovisual infrastructure," explains Owen, who estimates that the system saved as much as 10 rack spaces in each of the five classrooms.

The design of the device allows for classroom installation of four projectors and two confidence monitors, providing faculty with flexibility in their approach to instruction.

"The technology also gives us the ability to remotely provide support when the tech person at the Charlotte location is off duty, or to assist faculty and staff in an emergency," explains Owen.

The installation earned the school the AMX Connected Campus award. …

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