Eating on the Run

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), September 10, 2012 | Go to article overview

Eating on the Run


Eating on the run

With today's hectic lifestyles, most of us end up eating out at least once a week, according to Harvard Medical School.

Meals away from home make it harder to control ingredients, calories and portions. This can be particularly challenging for people with Type 2 diabetes. The following tips can help you enjoy eating out without abandoning your efforts to eat well.

Ask how the food is prepared: Before you order, ask about ingredients and how the menu selections are prepared. Try to choose dishes made with whole grains, healthy oils, vegetables and lean proteins. Meat that has been broiled, poached, baked or grilled is a more health-conscious option than fried foods or dishes prepared with heavy sauces.

Look for less: Your eyes are the perfect instrument for sizing up portion sizes. Use your estimating techniques to size up the food on your plate.

* 1 thumb tip = 1 teaspoon of peanut butter, butter or sugar

* 1 finger = 1 ounce of cheese

* 1 fist = 1 cup cereal, pasta or vegetables

* 1 handful = 1 ounce of nuts or pretzels

* 1 palm = 3 ounces of meat, fish or poultry

Order an extra side of veggies: Non-starchy vegetables, such as green beans, broccoli, asparagus or summer squash, will help you fill up with low-calorie choices. …

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