U.S. Needs More Jobs, Not More Lawsuits; Red and Blue Voters Are United on Need for Litigation Reform

By Hough, Chip; Houston, David | The Washington Times (Washington, DC), September 17, 2012 | Go to article overview

U.S. Needs More Jobs, Not More Lawsuits; Red and Blue Voters Are United on Need for Litigation Reform


Hough, Chip, Houston, David, The Washington Times (Washington, DC)


Byline: Chip Hough and David Houston, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Politically, California and Texas are worlds apart. Despite their blue state, red state ideological differences, the residents within those states share the common goals of robust job creation and a vibrant economy. The stories of these two states, however, are remarkably different.

While lawsuit reforms have played a key role in Texas' economic boom, California, which has failed to pass such reforms, remains mired in the economic doldrums with consistently high unemployment and tepid job creation. The economic dichotomy that exists between these states can be bridged by eliminating partisan politics from the equation. For too long, legal reform has been viewed through a Democrat vs. Republican prism. In fact, it's an economic issue.

The good news is that in the midst of the political knuckle-dragging, when it comes to lawsuit reforms, Americans get it. The American Tort Reform Association and Sick of Lawsuits recently conducted a national survey that found 9 in 10 Americans think lawsuit abuse is a problem. Moreover, 73 percent of Americans - across the political spectrum - are more likely to vote for a candidate for public office who supports lawsuit reform.

As small-business owners from very different parts of the country, we have seen firsthand how legal reform can provide a boost to the economy and how the lack of legal reform can hinder economic growth. Texas once had the biggest lawsuit-abuse problem in the country. Aggressive personal-injury trial lawyers played the courts like a litigation lottery. Businesses, including medical practices, were crushed by the costs of excessive litigation, and many simply stayed away, costing the state jobs and economic growth.

In response, Texas passed several significant legal reforms to introduce common sense into the civil justice system. Those reforms have helped the state create and retain jobs, enabled small-business employers to prosper and improved access to health care. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Needs More Jobs, Not More Lawsuits; Red and Blue Voters Are United on Need for Litigation Reform
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.