Moving to Glendon College (Canadian Institute of International Affairs)

Behind the Headlines, May 1998 | Go to article overview

Moving to Glendon College (Canadian Institute of International Affairs)


The CIIA National Office is on the move. After many years at the University of Toronto, mostly at University College and later at Trinity, we are relocating to Glendon College (York University), at 2275 Bayview Avenue, Toronto. The move is the result of a combination of factors but principally because the University of Toronto needs the space we now occupy for other purposes. Fortunately, we were able to reach an excellent arrangement with York University for space at Glendon College. Because our fundamental mission is largely public education, it is, I think, important for the Institute to retain a physical association with a university. The search for new accommodation was by no means confined to Toronto, but, at the end of the day, the Board of Directors agreed that Toronto remained the best location for the National Office. In the end, the space made available at Glendon College had so much to commend it that the final decision was taken with reassuring conviction.

The Institute will be accommodated in the former Principal's Residence in Glendon Hall. The first Principal of Glendon College was Escott Reid, the first Executive Secretary of the CIIA appointed in 1932. John Holmes, of beloved memory to so many members, had an equally close association with both the CIIA and Glendon College. That Glendon is a bilingual institution is also an attractive feature for a national body like the CIIA.

So, at the end of May, it's off to Bayview and Lawrence. Nevertheless, we leave Devonshire House with happy memories of our three years here. As a former residence for engineering students it had unique charm with rooms filled with untold stories of lively and not always studious pursuits. It was also close to our good friends in the International Relations Society of Trinity College and the many faculty members throughout the campus with whom we co-sponsored events and discussed the prospects for Canada in an ever-changing world. We are not, however, saying good-bye, as we intend to maintain these associations, established over many years, even as we develop new ones at York/Glendon. …

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