Mythology in Art

By Carroll, Colleen | Arts & Activities, October 2012 | Go to article overview

Mythology in Art


Carroll, Colleen, Arts & Activities


Clip & Save Instructions: The monthly Art Print is meant to be removed from the center of the magazine, laminated ar matted, and used as a resource in your art room.--Editor

Standard-variety snakes (think Garden of Eden) and their more fantastical cousins, dragons and sea serpents, have slithered, flown and swum through world mythology for millennia. In this month's Clip & Save Art Print, the dreaded Jormungand, also known as the Midgard Serpent breaks the surface of the ocean and comes face-to-face with Thor, the Viking god of thunder.

Before accounting the myth, it is important to know the players. On the left is Thor. In addition to being god of thunder, Thor is also the god of war and strongest of the Aesir, the principal race of the Norse gods. He is red-haired, quick-tempered and has eyes of lightning. Thor is also the protector of gods and mortals, and symbolizes the forces of good against evil.

His fishing companion is the giant Hymir, owner of a mile-wide cauldron the Aesir wanted to gain for themselves for brewing beer. And finally, there is Jormungand, the Midgard Serpent. Jormungand was the child of the trickster god, Loki, and the giantess Angrboda. Jormungard grew so large that the gods cast him into the sea. Unfortunately for them, the serpent continued to grow until it encircled the earth. ("Midgard" is the Norse word for Earth).

In this Norse tale, Thor (with whom students will most likely be familiar, given the recent motion pictures Thor, 2011 and The Avengers, 2012), leaves Asgard disguised as a young boy and enters the camp of the giant, Hymir. The disguised god asks the giant if he may accompany him on a fishing excursion, to which the giant begrudgingly agrees.

As bait, Thor brings the decapitated head of Hymir's oxen, Slay-Bellower. Once on the open sea, Thor drops the bait, which is quickly seized by an enormous creature from below. The following text is an excerpt from The Prose Edda, written by the Icelandic historian, Snorri Sturlason (1178-1241):

"The Midgard Serpent snapped at the ox-head, and the hook stuck fast in the roof of its mouth. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mythology in Art
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.