Middle/high School Software (Algebra Assistant; Exploring Ancient Cities, 2nd Edition; Brain Quest: 5th Grade)

By Nord, John; Kurtz, Alice et al. | Multimedia Schools, March-April 2000 | Go to article overview

Middle/high School Software (Algebra Assistant; Exploring Ancient Cities, 2nd Edition; Brain Quest: 5th Grade)


Nord, John, Kurtz, Alice, Finley, Sally, Multimedia Schools


Algebra Assistant

Company: Mathpert Software/Recognix, Inc., 2211 Lawson Lane, Santa Clara, CA 95054; Phone: 800/361-1001; Fax: 408/567-0659; E-mail: info@mathpert.com; Web: http://www. mathpert.com/.

Price: $95--Windows 3.1/95/98, single user version; $499--10-user network license. Macintosh version scheduled for spring 2000 release.

Audience: High school to adult.

Format: CD-ROM, text, graphics.

System Requirements: 386 IBM-compatible or higher, DOS 3.3, Windows 3.1, 8 MB RAM (16 MB recommended), 10 MB hard drive space (17 MB for full installation), CD-ROM drive, VGA Monitor (256 colors), and a Windows-compatible mouse.

Description: Algebra Assistant, the first module of a three-program learning system, allows introductory and intermediate-level students to work through algebra problems in detail, step-by-step.

Reviewer Comments:

The products are cumulative in nature: Calculus Assistant contains all of the materials included in both Pre-Calculus Assistant and Algebra Assistant. Pre-Calculus Assistant contains all of the problems and materials found in the initial offering, Algebra Assistant. As might be expected, Calculus Assistant is the most expensive package ($195--single user; $995--10-user network license).

The features of all three products are identical. Students can quickly check their work on problems by comparing answers with the computer. The disks include more than 6,700 problems; teachers and students can add new problems or change existing problems. All of the work can be printed for student work away from a computer, and it can be saved on a disk to be revisited later.

Algebra Assistant can offer hints so that students see only a single step of a problem, or it can work the entire problem showing each step (complete with annotation). As many as six different graphs can be produced on the screen simultaneously.

The program differs from the more powerful computer algebra systems in that it allows simple step-by-step interaction with the student.

With the straightforward menu, a student may select what he or she believes to be the next best, most plausible, step toward a solution. This simplicity frees teachers from spending additional time teaching the special codes and syntax that computer algebraic manipulators require.

The program's strength is its ability to remove the fear that some students have. It can eliminate trivial mistakes, offer hints, show what operation to perform next, perform the next step automatically, or provide a complete step-by-step solution.

Some learners need to know that the last step they tried was correct before they can move on to the next stop in a problem. For students who fear math, fear being wrong, or fear uncertainty, Algebra Assistant can be a constant reassurance that doesn't add to the teacher's load.

My experience with the 800-phone number was terrible! It took four tries to reach someone who would answer my questions about pricing information. I left voice messages twice and never received a single response.

I did not try Internet support because the product worked the first time, and the included user's guide suggested simple solutions to the "How-to" questions.

Algebra Assistant can be used as an additional method of reaching math students who aren't responding to current approaches for any variety of reasons. It is a simple and inexpensive method to add another way to help students to understand mathematics.

Reviewer: John Nord, Math Chair, Saint George's School, 2929 West Waikiki Rd., Spokane, WA 99208; 509/466-1636; john_nord40@yahoo.com.

Exploring Ancient Cities, 2nd Edition

Company: Sumeria, 329 Bryant Street, Suite 3D, San Francisco, CA 94107; Phone: 415/904-0800; Fax: 415/904-0888; Web: http://www.sumeria.com/.

Price: $50--hybrid Mac/Win, single copy; $179--five-user lab pack; $599--25-user site license. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Middle/high School Software (Algebra Assistant; Exploring Ancient Cities, 2nd Edition; Brain Quest: 5th Grade)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.