October Is National Bullying Prevention Month

Curriculum Review, September 2012 | Go to article overview

October Is National Bullying Prevention Month


This October marks National Bullying Prevention Month, an event that has been growing since 2006. The campaign website offers dozens of resources and plenty of information to help educate teachers, parents and students about the dangers of bullying, as well as useful tools to bring the campaign to your school.

Schoolyard bullying has become an increasingly important issue for schools to tackle, with destructive incidents resulting in tragic consequences, namely suicide. This National Bullying Prevention Month, join the movement and take action against this harmful practice.

By visiting www.PACER.org, you can find plenty of materials to get your school or classroom started in your own march against bullying. From research to videos to personal stories to news outlets reporting on bullying, there are dozens of hands-on guides and resources you can use.

Community Activities

You can even take your campaign into the community. Try incorporating one of these activities into your local movement:

* Run, Walk, Roll Against Bullying--On Saturday, Oct. 6, dozens of communities, schools and other organizations will come together in the Run, Walk, Roll Against Bullying. This fun, community-building outdoor event serves to increase awareness of bullying's harmful effects and raises funds to support prevention. You can find a free toolkit on www.PACER.com to help you organize a Run, Walk, Roll within your school or local community.

* Unity Day--On Oct. 10, people will "wear orange and use PACER resources to support the cause, hand out orange 'UNITY' ribbons at school and write 'UNITY' on their hands or binders" in a movement to "Make it Orange and Make it End!" Ellen DeGeneres promoted this cause in 2011 by wearing orange on TV to remind viewers about the importance of bullying prevention. And Facebook's Unity Day Event (https://www.facebook.com/events/314141468640954) provides support, too.

Join the Movement

There are several other ways you and your students can join the anti-bullying movement this National Bullying Prevention Month. Try these ideas that allow you to be an active member in the commitment to end bullying:

* Sign up as a Champion Against Bullying--Champions Against Bullying can help spread the message about ending bullying to their local communities. …

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