Children's Souls Need Care

By Devine, Nancy | Anglican Journal, January 1998 | Go to article overview

Children's Souls Need Care


Devine, Nancy, Anglican Journal


JUST BEFORE CHRISTMAS, Conscience Canada, a Victoria-based peace lobby group, called on Canadian parents to declare their homes war toy free zones. "Be aware of what our kids watch on TV," the words on the flyer loudly proclaimed "Let toy manufacturers know how we feel. Spread the word in our communities. Be confident that change can happen."

This kind of call to action is laudable, but it's like putting an adhesive strip on a gaping wound that needs stitches. So what if the collective efforts of parents can damage the sales figures for Mercenary Mike's Mega Battle Bomber? I think parents should ban war toys. At the same time, they need to find a set of values and stick to them.

Banning war toys does little to teach children the way of peace. The truth is, children, especially little boys, will build guns from their peaceful Lego blocks. Many of them will also chew their toast into the shape of a gun or turn their hockey stick into a rifle. They do this because it is part of their playful fantasy. As they mature, and if their parents help them, they learn to separate fact from fiction. A war toy boycott is a good start, but children need something more from us.

As a Christian, I am committed to raising children who are both mentally balanced and spiritually well-equipped to take over the world when we are gone.

We need to teach children to pray. There is no harm in taking a few minutes from each day to thank God for the gift of life and its blessings. If life is revered daily in this way, perhaps children will grow into folks who think twice before endangering their lives and those of the people around them.

Parents need to be courageous enough to ask for help when the job of parenting is getting tough. There are courses to take. There are knowledgeable people to help. Churches must offer leadership and provide guidance in this area. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Children's Souls Need Care
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.