The Obamacons, Revisited

Newsweek, September 10, 2012 | Go to article overview

The Obamacons, Revisited


In 2008, Barack Obama boasted the support of more than 40 prominent Republicans and conservatives. These "ObamaCons" were offered as a barometer of Obama's crossover appeal, evidence of his ability to unite the nation. But four years later, do the ObamaCons regret their decision? Are they returning to their roots and supporting Mitt Romney? Or are they sticking with Obama? Newsweek asked several to weigh in.

William Weld, FORMER GOP GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS

'I'm supporting Governor Romney this time because I think his experience makes him best equipped to stimulate economic growth and job creation, which I see as our No. 1 issue.'

Wick Allison, PUBLISHER OF THE AMERICAN CONSERVATIVE

'I will probably vote for Obama, unless I have a Gary Johnson inspiration in the voting booth. (My vote in Texas is wasted anyway.) Romney is the opposite of conservative, with a plan that is fiscally reckless and a foreign policy that is unnecessarily militant ... My questions about Obamacare and my disappointment that we are not already out of Afghanistan are not enough to make me embrace a candidacy that even George W. Bush would have been repelled by--and, having had time to reflect on his own record, perhaps is.'

Charles Fried, SOLICITOR GENERAL UNDER RONALD REAGAN

'Having abandoned John McCain--a decent and independent-minded man--when he picked Sarah Palin, I most certainly could not support Governor Romney, who has been pandering to the extreme wing of my party from the start of his campaign for the nomination. …

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