My Digital Wedding

By Ries, Brian | Newsweek, October 22, 2012 | Go to article overview

My Digital Wedding


Ries, Brian, Newsweek


Byline: Brian Ries

I tweet, I pin, I do.

I asked my girlfriend to marry me on a boat on the wide expanse of Lake George. There was no iPhone to capture the moment, no Twitter to tweet or Facebook to share, and, back at our campsite, no AT&T service to call home with the news. There were only s'mores. And champagne.

For the two of us, it was nice. But I'll tell ya, future marrieds: the lull couldn't last. Within minutes, we were in my Jeep, driving 10 miles out of the woods, where we sat on the shoulder of a road trying, to no avail, to make the engagement "Facebook official." (Turns out you can't update your relationship status from the iPhone app. A Facebook spokesperson says the company plans on adding this feature in the future.) Lacking the digital evidence, we wondered, had it even happened?

With five weeks behind us and still a year out from the date, the engagement is as real as the ring. Our wedding now has a hashtag, a website in the works, and a growing list of potential vendors we've found online. Yelp is our beacon. Facebook our guide. (No surprise: in my day job I'm head of social media at Newsweek and The Daily Beast, managing accounts and watching for news.) My fiancee has grown particularly fond of Pinterest, the photo-sharing network used by a whopping 19 percent of women on the Internet, per one recent Pew study. …

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