The Development of Professional Counseling in Uganda: Current Status and Future Trends

By Senyonyi, Ruth M.; Ochieng, Lois A. et al. | Journal of Counseling and Development : JCD, October 2012 | Go to article overview

The Development of Professional Counseling in Uganda: Current Status and Future Trends


Senyonyi, Ruth M., Ochieng, Lois A., Sells, James, Journal of Counseling and Development : JCD


The Republic of Uganda is a landlocked country in East Africa covering 241,038 square kilometers with a population of 33.4 million people (U.S. Department of State, Bureau of African Affairs, n.d.). It is about the same size as the state of Oregon, in the United States, but with a population 10 times larger. It is bordered by Kenya, South Sudan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Rwanda, and Tanzania. Uganda has an equatorial climate modified by its altitude (1,000-1,500 meters above sea level) with rainfall that can reach 2,000 millimeters per year (Government of Uganda, 2008).

Uganda is a country with diverse cultures and several ethnicities. There are 17 ethnic tribes, the largest being Baganda (17%), Banyankole/Bahima (10%), Basoga (8%), Bakiga (7%), Banyarwanda (6%), Langi (6%), Acholi (5%), Bagisu (5%), Lugbara (4%), Banyoro (3%), Batoro (3%), and Karamajong (2%; U.S. Department of State, Bureau of African Affairs, n.d.). There are 45 individual languages and dialects in Uganda, with English as the official language. Other widely spoken languages include Luganda and Swahili. The main religions are Christianity (85%), Islam (12%), and other faiths (3%). Uganda's population is predominantly rural with a high density in the southern regions. The World Bank (n.d.) indicates Uganda as a low-income developing country with a gross domestic product of $17 billion in 2010. It is an agro-based economy that produces coffee, tea, cotton, bananas, potatoes, millet, and corn.

Present-day Uganda began with the establishment of a protectorate by the British over the kingdom of Buganda in 1894. In 1962, Uganda gained independence; was granted self-rule; and, in 1967, was proclaimed a republic (Leguineche & Ibingira, 1991). Uganda became notorious for its human rights abuses during the military dictatorship of Idi Amin (1971-1979) when thousands of Ugandans were killed. The current president, Yoweri Kaguta Museveni (1986-present), brought relative stability with democratic reforms and improved human rights. However, the present government has been riddled with civil war, where, for 30 years, the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) has waged a guerrilla war from bases in northern Uganda, the DRC, and South Sudan. In addition, the circumstances of corruption, poverty, instability, and diseases, especially HIV/AIDS and malaria, have led to poor mental and general psychosocial ill health.

* The Development of Counseling in Uganda

Counseling in Uganda can trace its roots and foundations in three areas: the nonformal guidance system offered in the traditional culture, clan, and family; guidance and counseling offered in schools for choosing subjects and careers; and counseling offered to curb the 30-year epidemic of HIV/AIDS (Senyonyi & Ochieng, in press).

Traditional Culture and the Nonformal Guidance System

The traditional cultures upheld their legacies and passed on what was important through the nuclear family, extended families, and the community. These, in turn, were expected to meet the needs of guidance and support of members at fundamental life events, such as pregnancy, birth, adolescence, marriage, and death. The parents, aunts, uncles, grandparents, elders, and members of the community had clear roles and responsibilities for the well-being of the community. Traditional religions played their part in that counseling was performed in accordance with cultural and religious beliefs. This traditional counseling is more community oriented, unlike counseling in Western countries, which tends to be more subjective, personal, and tailored to the individual. However, this very important role of family and community support is disintegrating with fast-growing urbanization and individualism, hence the need for professionalized counseling (Senyonyi & Ochieng, in press).

Guidance and Counseling in Schools

The Ministry of Education and Sports (MOE) established a policy in 1968 on guidance and counseling to streamline counseling in schools (MOE, 2004). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Development of Professional Counseling in Uganda: Current Status and Future Trends
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.