"Where the Spirit of the Lord Is, There Is Freedom": Black Spirituality and the Rise of the Antislavery Movement, 1740-1841

By Wheaton Cappiello, Dianne | Journal of Pan African Studies, March 2012 | Go to article overview

"Where the Spirit of the Lord Is, There Is Freedom": Black Spirituality and the Rise of the Antislavery Movement, 1740-1841


Wheaton Cappiello, Dianne, Journal of Pan African Studies


This dissertation traces the evolution of black abolitionism in colonial North America and the United States from 1740 to 1841. Focusing primarily on reformers, theologians, and activists, it examines specifically the ways in which spiritual beliefs shaped black opposition to slavery. It places black abolitionists in an international context and analyzes the transatlantic connections they developed and maintained in their battle against slavery and prejudice.

Inspired by eighteenth-century pietistic revival, a West African cosmological heritage, and the Enlightenment emphasis on natural rights, men and women of African descent began protesting slavery publicly during the colonial era. With the onset of the American Revolution, they located republican egalitarianism within a sacred framework and underscored the contradiction inherent in a slaveholding polity allegedly predicated on Protestant Christianity. After 1800, many black activists adapted the pietistic model of itinerancy and evangelism to agitate against both slavery and racial discrimination. During the 1820s, black antislavery reformers, disillusioned by the nation's rejection of abolition and angered by the American Colonization Society's 1817 plan to send free blacks to Africa, embraced more radical measures. …

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