Auguste, Margaret. VOYA'S Guide to Intellectual Freedom for Teens

By Squicciarini, Stephanie A. | Young Adult Library Services, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

Auguste, Margaret. VOYA'S Guide to Intellectual Freedom for Teens


Squicciarini, Stephanie A., Young Adult Library Services


Auguste, Margaret. VOYA'S Guide to Intellectual Freedom for Teens. VOYA Press, 2012, ISBN: 978-1-61751-007-6, 204p, $32 (VOYA subscribers); $40 (all others). Bernier, Anthony (editor). VOYA'S YA Spaces of Your Dreams. VOYA Press, 2012, ISBN: 978-61751-011-3, 244p, $40 (VOYA subscribers); $50 (all others). Danner, Brandy. Dark Futures: A VOYA Guide to Apocalyptic, Post-Apocalyptic, and Dystopian Books and Media. VOYA Press, 2012, ISBN: 978-1-61751-005-2, 242p, $40 (VOYA subscribers); $50 (all others). Plumb, Daria. Commando Classics: A Field Manual for Helping Teens Understand (and Maybe Even Enjoy) Classic Literature. VOYA Press, 2012, ISBN: 978-1-61751-008-3, 300p, $40 (VOYA subscribers); $50 (all others).

These four new guides from VOYA Press will prove invaluable to those, whether a school or public librarian, who add them to their professional collections. All clearly written or edited by experts in their particular field of focus, VOYA offers up a well-rounded group of resources for practitioners.

Margaret Auguste in Intellectual Freedom for Teens has pulled together a stellar resource for use during Banned Books Week and far beyond. The book lives up to its promise in the introduction, which states it "will give librarians the tools that they need to fight against censorship and for intellectual freedom for young people." These tools include suggestions of partnerships that support intellectual freedom related programming, ideas of educational activities for the classroom, suggestions on where to find pertinent booklists, summaries of both formal and informal challenges and cases, and the steps to take and critical components to include when creating a selection and intellectual freedom policy. Auguste further provides clear and concise examples librarians and administrators can use when responding to a challenge, as well as information on how to preemptively prepare (i.e., having alternative reading suggestions that share a theme with required reading texts) for challenges. Early chapters focus on the themes that often get cited in challenges (sexuality, violence, profanity, religion) with each chapter including a variety of viewpoints and information on how librarians can take action. Later chapters focus on the frontline people often involved with challenges and include a section each for authors, librarians, teachers, and teens. Each section includes resources and methods for addressing challenges.

VOYA'S YA Spaces of Your Dreams is a compilation of spaces profiled, from 1999 through 2010, in VOYA's feature articles of the same name. Editor Anthony Bernier provides a thorough introduction that includes a summary of findings from a follow-up survey he conducted with the staff of the profiled YA spaces. While not all the libraries responded, the survey does provide a good overview of the space-related trends noted and experienced by the librarians. This includes what is popular in teen space over time, the increase or decrease in the amount of square footage of YA space to total library space, and the impact of organizational changes on YA space. …

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