Teacher Evaluation and Student Testing

Radical Teacher, Fall 2012 | Go to article overview

Teacher Evaluation and Student Testing


This nation is waging a war on its teachers and their unions, blaming teachers for low standing on national and international tests, humiliating them by publishing teacher ratings based on standardized test scores, and portraying them as the national enemy in such big budget films as Bad Teacher and Waiting for Superman (The Washington Post, March 13, 2012). Part of this antipathy is explained in "A Brief History of the Education Culture Wars: On Santorum's Legacy, the GOP, and School Reform" (The Nation, March 1, 2012) which explores how a "coalition of religious conservatives and extreme tax-cutters prefers to vilify public schools--and actually, pretty much any traditional educational institution, including liberal arts colleges--as potential corruptors of the nation's youth: as unwanted interlocutors in that most sacred relationship: the one between a child and her parent."

In The New York Review of Books blog, (March 8, 2012 and February 22, 2012), education historian and writer Diane Ravitch evaluates Arne Duncan's performance as Secretary of Education and his Race to the Top program created for the Obama administration. …

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