Acupuncture Can Ease Kids' Pain

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), October 29, 2012 | Go to article overview

Acupuncture Can Ease Kids' Pain


Byline: Laura Ungar The Washington Post.

At age 17, Victoria Rust came down with pancreatitis, suffering waves of terrible pain that kept her hospitalized for much of last year.

When the only medicine that was helping her caused stomach bleeding and had to be stopped, a doctor at Childrens National Medical Center suggested an unconventional treatment: acupuncture.

Rust and her mother agreed to let a physician at Childrens Hospital place thin needles into her stomach and other spots; within minutes, the West Virginia high school student felt much better.

"I was mellowed," she said. "The pain didnt come." The needles turned out to be no big deal.

Children and needles may seem an unusual pairing, but doctors say a growing number of families are choosing acupuncture, in which thin needles are inserted into specific points on the body and manipulated by hand or with electrical stimulation with the goal of restoring and maintaining health. Its often performed when standard medicines or therapies dont work, have too many side effects or need a boost.

Acupuncture is increasingly being prescribed and performed by physicians in such traditional Western hospital settings as Childrens. Last year, an analysis in the journal Pediatrics concluded that acupuncture was safe for kids "when performed by appropriately trained practitioners."

Officials at pediatric hospitals estimate that at least a third of U.S. pain centers for children offer acupuncture alongside traditional treatments. The federal governments National Health Interview Survey, which last asked about acupuncture in 2007, estimated that about 150,000 children were receiving the needle treatment annually for conditions such as pain, migraine and anxiety.

"People will often bring it up before I bring it up," said Jennifer Anderson, an anesthesiologist at Childrens who is also a licensed acupuncturist. "I often treat patients with chronic issues" such as nausea and abdominal pain. "Its very helpful."

The American Academy of Pediatrics acknowledges that more young patients are undergoing acupuncture and other alternative therapies, and an article in its journal, Pediatrics, says a growing number of pediatric generalists and subspecialists are offering these services. It also urges doctors to seek information on such practices when families express interest, evaluate them on their scientific merits and pass information to parents.

Anderson and other doctors said acupuncture is an important and safe adjunct to traditional treatments for children. A 2008 review of studies published in the Journal of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology cited evidence that acupuncture is effective for preventing nausea after surgery in children and for alleviating pain. It said theres some evidence that it can help children with allergy symptoms but pointed out that more study is needed.

Anderson said she often does two to three treatments a week at first on a child, eventually tapering visits to once a month. Stephen Cowan, a New York pediatrician who is also a certified medical acupuncturist, said Western medicine is great for acute problems that often afflict kids, such as ear infections. But he said acupuncture can be extremely helpful for such chronic or difficult-to-treat problems as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and asthma.

He related the case of a year-old boy who came to the hospital at 3 a.m. with an asthma attack. A nebulizer treatment wasnt working, Cowan said, so he decided to try acupuncture. The boy reacted calmly, and his pulse-oximeter readings went up to 95 percent, which is within the normal range.

"Im not advocating replacing Western treatments. Im asking: Where can [acupuncture] serve best in the system of medicine pervasive in our culture?" said Cowan, author of the ADHD book "Fire Child, Water Child." "Acupuncture doesnt cure infection. But I find it very useful in preventive care," such as alleviating stress, he said. …

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