'Disappointed by the Worldwide Gender Pay Gap'

By Tilley, Charles | Financial Management (UK), October 2012 | Go to article overview

'Disappointed by the Worldwide Gender Pay Gap'


Tilley, Charles, Financial Management (UK)


CIMA's most recent global salary survey of members and students makes for reassuring reading. The results show clearly that the CIMA community is in demand worldwide and earning well above national averages. The majority of our members and students also firmly believe that the qualification creates career opportunities and gives them greater scope to move across all areas of business. But having said that, the report also reveals an ongoing cause for concern.

Undoubtedly, CIMA's professional qualification opens doors. But in terms of earning power, there is still a gulf in many countries between men and women. This is not a surprise. Our 2010 report, "Breaking glass: strategies for tomorrow's leaders", highlighted the fact that women still lagged behind men in terms of seniority and salary--even in the comparatively meritocratic profession of management accountancy.

The surprise is in the scale of the problem. Our salary survey (see page 62 for a full report) shows that among our student population, the earnings gap between genders is generally under ten per cent (and mostly in the region of three to six per cent). While this is not acceptable, the divide really begins to grow among members. No global region seems to be immune, and in many cases the disparity goes above 20 per cent. These include: South Africa, Sri Lanka, Ireland, Australia, New Zealand and Malaysia. Most surprising of all, the league table is topped by Singapore, with 44 per cent disparity, and the USA with a 52 per cent gap.

To put these figures into context, our researchers point out that part of this trend can be attributed to the fact that more senior male members answered our questionnaire than their female contemporaries. Added to this a significant number of female respondents said that they work part time or had a short working week. Evidently, this will have an impact on the overall statistics.

But it does not explain the whole problem. The phenomenon is too widespread. And I cannot help but feel disappointed that the gap is still so wide--particularly in a profession such as management accountancy where, as I have mentioned already, you would assume an individual would be assessed on their ability and not their gender. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'Disappointed by the Worldwide Gender Pay Gap'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.