University Replies: Why This Animal Research Is Necessary; Yousay IN YOUR OPINION

South Wales Echo (Cardiff, Wales), November 3, 2012 | Go to article overview

University Replies: Why This Animal Research Is Necessary; Yousay IN YOUR OPINION


The letter "Join us to end animal testing" (You Say, October 26) gives the impression that Cardiff University is somehow "silent" over its research involving animals.

The 2010 South Wales Echo feature, to which the letter refers, resulted in a visit by the former Deputy Leader of Cardiff Council following his critical remarks - and subsequent visits by others from various political parties - to see the research and discuss it in detail.

We respond to many requests for information from members of the public and from councillors, AMs and MPs, welcoming in any elected politician to the university to discuss their and their constituents' concerns.

We also, along with organisations such as Understanding Animal Research, communicate this important work in a variety of ways and give people scope to ask questions.

Let's be clear: Cardiff University does not and has never used animals for testing the effects of foodstuffs, household and cosmetic goods. Our work to better understand the way that biological systems function is aimed at the alleviation of suffering (in humans and animals) and is not done for the purpose of commercial gain.

At the university our work seeks to address key health conditions including cancer; blindness and myopia, glaucoma and other eye conditions; Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's, Huntingdon's, dementia, stroke, memory disorders, angina and heart attack; cystic fibrosis, asthma, arthritis, obesity; diabetes; sleep disorders; hypertension; and schizophrenia to name but a few.

Cardiff has some of the world's leading experts working on these problems and as a result of our high quality findings, our research profile and activity in the health sciences is growing.

Where possible, we use cells grown in a lab, computer models and human volunteers. In 2006, Cardiff University made a major investment (PS12m) in brain imaging equipment to study human brains in living people. …

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University Replies: Why This Animal Research Is Necessary; Yousay IN YOUR OPINION
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