Editor's Note

By Bardi, Jennifer | The Humanist, November-December 2012 | Go to article overview

Editor's Note


Bardi, Jennifer, The Humanist


WHEN I was asked to introduce Gloria Steinem at the annual conference of the American Humanist Association (AHA) and present her with the 2012 Humanist of the Year Award, to say I was thrilled is surely the understatement of the year.

And then I started thinking it made sense-she's a woman, I'm a woman. She was the editor of a magazine you all know--Ms.--I'm the editor of a magazine you all know. She campaigned for Adlai Stevenson and George McGovern; she covered Nixon's 1968 presidential campaign; she did undercover investigative reporting on the Playboy Club. In 1972 Steinem coined the phrase "reproductive freedom" as a member of the National Women's Political Caucus. She's been on the forefront of women's issues for over forty years and is considered the feminist icon of the modern era.

I ... well, naturally, I stopped the comparison right there. But seriously, when I think about women who have influenced me, there are the personal and there are the political, so to speak. And when we think about public figures who have influenced women, Gloria Steinem is right up there at the top. So, as I boasted to anyone who would listen that I was going to meet her, I noticed two things: everyone was impressed, and the women invariably said, "I love her!"

We do love her. We say this and we feel this because of who she is, because of what she's done and what she says. And, as such a positive force, we're also compelled to claim her--as a feminist, as an icon, and yes, as a humanist because her message is one that challenges hierarchy, that challenges authoritarian oppression. To affirm the inherent worth and dignity of all humans-that's the humanist message, right? ]hat's hers too. To focus on the fact that ha/f the human population has never been afforded the same worth and dignity as the other seems like a pretty good place for any humanist to direct her energy. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Editor's Note
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.