A New System for Principal Evaluation

By DeNisco, Alison | District Administration, November 2012 | Go to article overview

A New System for Principal Evaluation


DeNisco, Alison, District Administration


Principals represent a major force in school systems--95,000 principals are responsible for overseeing 3 million teachers and 55 million pre-K8 students. Though they are second only to teachers in terms of school influence on student success, inconsistencies and concerns with practices for principal evaluation abound.

So, the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP) and the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) developed "Rethinking Principal Evaluation: A New Paradigm Informed by Research and Practice," a set of guidelines for evaluation presented at a September Congressional briefing. This is the first time that both research and principal experiences were considered to create rules schools can use for more effective evaluations, says Gall Connelly, NAESP executive director.

The report was developed by a joint committee of practicing principals nationwide over the past two years. It identifies six key domains of school leadership that should be included in principal evaluation systems to create more successful schools: professional growth and learning; student growth and achievement; school planning and progress; school culture; professional qualities and instructional leadership; and stakeholder support and engagement

"We wanted to pair the practical knowledge and wisdom from principals with the realities of the research," says Connelly. …

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